After I’ve Gone by Linda Green

after i'VE GONE.jpgTitle: After I’ve Gone
Author: Linda Green
Genre: Thriller/Crime
Publisher: Quercus/Hachette
Published: 25th July 2017
Format: Paperback
Pages: 440
Price: $29.99
Synopsis: You have 18 months left to live . . . On a wet Monday in January, Jess Mount checks Facebook and discovers her timeline appears to have skipped forward 18 months, to a day when shocked family and friends are posting heart-breaking tributes to her following her death in an accident. Jess is left scared and confused: is she the target of a cruel online prank or is this a terrifying glimpse of her true fate?
Amongst the posts are photos of a gorgeous son she has not yet conceived. But when new posts suggest her death was deliberate, Jess realises that if she changes the future to save her own life, the baby boy she has fallen in love with may never exist.

~*~

After abrasively brushing off someone who gropes her on public transport, Jess Mount has a chance encounter with someone who seems too good to be true: too good-looking, too polite – he seems too perfect, and at the time, Jess is in no mood to be hit on whilst she heads to work with her best friend Sadie as a cinema hostess. After encountering this man – Lee – she begins seeing strange posts and messages on her Facebook, eighteen months into the future, hinting at her death, and a child she hasn’t even imagined having yet. Only she can see these posts though, and the people around her begin to question her state of mind as the novel goes on, delving into past events that have had an effect on her since she was fifteen. As she enters a relationship with Lee, she ignores warning signs and threats, until the messages begin to make sense, and she makes moves to change her fate, including how she refers to her unborn child.

Using first person narrative, and told through the eyes of Jess and Lee’s mother, Angela, the novel moves through the months that lead up to the birth of the child the future posts hint at, the courtship, a wedding and Lee’s changing attitudes towards her. The world is shown through the eyes of Jess and Angela, both not wanting to see the bad side to Lee, both trying to cover up what is really happening, but with one looking for an ending that will not be what her Facebook feed determines it will be.

It is a thriller that has a twisted romance within it, and it was a rather strange storyline – for example, the if, why and how the future and messages appear are not dealt with, and perhaps this works best. Perhaps what has been hinted at from Jess’s past is what has her seeing them. However, as we are not given an answer, the reader is left to speculate and fill in any gaps in the alternating chapters themselves.

Whilst not my usual genre to read, I gave this a decent try, and read it with an open mind. At first, I felt it was slow but the last half or so I read quickly to find out what happened. I did find it a strange, creepy and perhaps interesting premise given how much people live their lives on social media these days, and it did work for the novel. I may pass this on, as I don’t think it is my cup of tea. I am confident that Linda’s fan base and readers of this genre will enjoy it though, and I hope that they do.

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Soon by Lois Murphy

Soon_cover-for-publicity-600x913.jpgTitle: Soon

Author: Lois Murphy

Genre: Literary Thriller

Publisher: Transit Lounge

Published: 1st October 2017

Format: Paperback

Pages: 288

Price: $29.95

Synopsis: An almost deserted town in the middle of nowhere, Nebulah’s days of mining and farming prosperity – if they ever truly existed – are long gone. These days even the name on the road sign into town has been removed. Yet for Pete, an ex-policeman, Milly, Li and a small band of others, it’s the only place they have ever felt at home.

One winter solstice the birds disappear. A strange, residual and mysterious mist arrives. It is a real and potent force, yet also emblematic of the complacency and unease that afflicts so many of our small towns, and the country that Murphy knows so well.

Partly inspired by the true story of Wittenoom, the ill-fated West Australian asbestos town, Soon is the story of the death of a haunted town, and the plight of the people who either won’t or simply can’t abandon all they have ever had. With finely wrought characters and brilliant storytelling, it is a taut and original novel, where the people we come to know and those who are drawn to the town’s intrigue must ultimately fight for survival.
‘A dark and powerful novel that takes the reader on a journey through a disturbingly new and hostile world. Lois’s characters carry their old ways into this new order with grave consequences if they don’t heed the signs. Her haunting and persuasive tale which nods at the tropes of genre fiction while subverting and elevating them heralds a compelling new talent.’

Hamish Maxwell-Stewart, Kate Gordon and Chris Gallagher, Judges, Tasmanian University Prize, Tasmanian Premier’s Awards

‘A  powerful literary thriller where the dark, yet poetically beautiful detailing of events will draw you into a nightmarish world that will have you questioning your understanding of love and loss, and the very nature of your reality. Atmospheric, intense and thought provoking.’

Dominique Wilson, author of  That Devil’s Madness and The Yellow Papers

~*~

aww2017-badgeSoon is an unusual book – a paranormal mystery that envelopes a mysterious, fictional mining town in Western Australia called Nebulah, where Pete, Milly and Li are amongst the last remaining residents of the town after the winter solstice when the birds disappear, and the mist descends upon the town, picking people off slowly, one by one. Pete, an ex-policeman, Milly, Li, a Cambodian who fled the Khmer Rouge, and the other remaining residents, feel it is the only place they belong, and are forced to stand by, watching the mist suck the life out of people and the town, unable to explain it, and unable to get help from the police in a neighbouring town, who believe it to be a hoax, a prank or Pete covering up something they believe he – or another – has done. There is a sense of stubbornness about these people who won’t leave a town that has had the life sucked out of it and run from a mist that won’t stop until the town’s last resident has had their life sucked away. It is a strange story, where I felt a bit lost until half way through, where things started to make a bit of sense, and from there, the plot unfolded to reveal the fates of those left, and the lives that the town and mist mercilessly stole from innocent people.

The world that Lois Murphy has created is also hostile and dark world that perhaps uses the paranormal elements that kill Nebulah to explore dying towns around Australia that collapse after people or industries leave, having sucked the place dry of resources, or industries closing down. The press release cites Wittenoom, an ill-fated asbestos town as the inspiration for Nebulah, a town where the residents who have lived there for years, face grave consequences for straining against whatever new order or forces the mist heralds. The devastating consequences of the choices made by some characters are not sugar coated, but dealt with in a raw and very visual fashion.

It was an unusual story, though it had a sense of mystery, it was not quite the kind of mystery I was expecting. However, it was still intriguing enough for me to complete the novel. It may not be one I will read again, but I am sure there is an audience out there for it. As thrillers go, the air of difference about this one is perhaps what will make it stand out in bookstores for prospective readers.

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The Night Visitor by Lucy Atkins

the night visitor

Title: The Night Visitor

Author: Lucy Atkins

Genre: Fiction, Crime and Mystery

Publisher: Hachette Australia

Published: 30th May 2017

Format: Paperback

Pages: 360

Price: $32.99

Synopsis: How far would you go to save your reputation? The stunning new noir thriller from the author of the bestselling THE MISSING ONE and THE OTHER CHILD. Perfect for fans of I LET YOU GO and THE ICE TWINS.

Professor Olivia Sweetman has worked hard to achieve the life she loves, with a high-flying career as a TV presenter and historian, three children and a talented husband. But as she stands before a crowd at the launch of her new bestseller she can barely pretend to smile. Her life has spiralled into deceit and if the truth comes out, she will lose everything.

Only one person knows what Olivia has done. Vivian Tester is the socially awkward sixty-year-old housekeeper of a Sussex manor who found the Victorian diary on which Olivia’s book is based. She has now become Olivia’s unofficial research assistant. And Vivian has secrets of her own.

As events move between London, Sussex and the idyllic South of France, the relationship between these two women grows more entangled and complex. Then a bizarre act of violence changes everything.

THE NIGHT VISITOR is a compelling exploration of ambition, morality and deception that asks the question: how far would you go to save your reputation?

~*~

The Night Visitor opens with a book launch, with Olivia Sweetman introducing the book she has just written to the world. As she speaks to the swelling crowd, she spies her research assistant within, the woman who has been on her mind on and off for months, researching the book and in other areas, Vivian Tester. Vivian has turned up to the book launch, whether out of spite or curiosity it isn’t certain, but she has been privy to the recent spiralling deceit that has taken hold of Olivia’s life.

Moving between third person perspective for Olivia, and first person for Vivian, the seeds of deceit are planted and slowly, the worlds that Olivia has worked so hard to keep separate begin to collide, forcing secrets to come out and people to fall apart. Between London, Sussex and France, each event leads up to a conclusion that leaves itself open for interpretation, without a fair or complete wrapping up to each of the fraying threads of the story. However, this did work for the story, as Vivian and Olivia were both trying to keep secrets and both trying to keep the threads of their lives from inevitably unravelling.

Both women were flawed – they weren’t perfect, although I got the impression that Vivian thought she was perfect and the way she acted towards Olivia, the way the story played out when the truth about the stalker was revealed and the hints to Vivian’s past were slowly released, and in the end, allowed some understanding of her motives and the goal she had to discredit someone she thought had wronged her. Though it did feel as though Vivian was the type of person who simply could not let something go, even when faced with apologies and evidence that she needed to back off.

The surprises at the end answered a few questions that came up early in the book, and I found the first few chapters a little slow, but they built up nicely to the France section and the events that occurred there that further unravelled the perfect threads of Olivia’s life and questioned everything she knew. In the end, it was an intriguing book, one for readers of psychological thrillers, and an interesting yet somewhat strange ending, as it was the sort of scene I would expect to open a crime novel, but perhaps that is what makes it such a strange yet incredulous and readable novel – that the reader doesn’t know what will happen or what is driving Vivian and Olivia, what connections they have, if any, beyond the research assistant task Vivian has taken on. In creating less than perfect characters, Lucy Atkins has created a work that shows the flaws of human nature and desire and asks the question of just how far some people will go to maintain their reputation.

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A Game of Ghosts by John Connolly

game of ghosts .jpg

Title: A Game of Ghosts

Author: John Connolly

Genre: Crime, Thriller

Publisher: Hachette Australia

Published: 11th April 2017

Format: Paperback

Pages: 455

Price: $32.99

Synopsis: It is deep winter. The darkness is unending.

It is deep winter. The darkness is unending.

The private detective named Jaycob Eklund has vanished, and Charlie Parker is dispatched to track him down. Parker’s employer, Edgar Ross, an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, has his own reasons for wanting Eklund found.

Eklund is no ordinary investigator. He is obsessively tracking a series of homicides and disappearances, each linked to reports of hauntings. Now Parker will be drawn into Eklund’s world, a realm in which the monstrous Mother rules a crumbling criminal empire, in which men strike bargains with angels, and in which the innocent and guilty alike are pawns in a game of ghosts . . .

~*~

The latest in the Charlie Parker series, A Game of Ghosts is full of chills and mystery. In the aftermath of a previous storyline, Charlie is grappling with the prospect he may not see daughter Sam, after a case put his family in danger. Also hinting at previous novels, Charlie’s dead wife and daughter are mentioned, the impetus that began the series, and the character. In this offering, my first outing with Charlie, a private investigator – Jaycob Eklund has gone missing – an investigator unlike any other, one who has of late, been looking into homicides and disappearances that are linked to reports of hauntings, where a paranormal, ghostly presence is constantly felt. The mystery lies in who the people behind these events are, and why.

Slowly, the novel brings to light the Brethren, the group that Eklund had been looking into, and their history, going back generations and linking them together as family, in some ways that are quite unusual and the close-knit community resembles a cult, though this word is not often used to describe them. Charlie must look into this group, find them and bring them to justice, whilst protecting his daughter and maintaining a relationship with her, and ensure that she is not harmed or hurt in any way. It is as much a story about the family dynamic as it is about the crime.

John Connolly’s narrative explores various aspects of the human psychology, from the protective instincts of a parent, to what drives someone to join a cult and kill, and beyond. With a cast of characters that appear sometimes for brief moments, Connolly’s story is chilling and compelling, something that demands to be read to the conclusion. In varying the length of the chapters, Connolly ensures a great pace, so that I was able to read up to fifteen chapters in one sitting, but not have the story drag along nor speed along – the slow chapters interrogated the psychology of the various players in the story – the victims, the killers, the investigators and those around them who weren’t involved in the case, and the fast chapters showed action and a little bit of the psychology, hinting at things to come for some characters. These fast and slow, short and long chapters work for this genre really well – the crime thriller genre, to keep the reader interested, and keep the intrigue up.

The pacing picks up in the last few chapters as events and those involved come to a head, and it feels like it is all over quickly, however, this ending works well for the novel, and doesn’t drag on for ages. It is action packed as well.

All in all, a decent crime thriller for fans of the genre and series. An enjoyable read, and one that can be devoured quickly or savoured.

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Tattletale by Sarah J Naughton

tattletale.jpg

Title: Tattletale

Author: Sarah J Naughton

Genre: Ficiton/Thriller

Publisher: Hachette Australia

Published: 28th March 2017

Format: Paperback

Pages: 330

Price: $29.99

Synopsis: One day changes Jody’s life forever.

She has shut herself down, haunted by her memories and unable to trust anyone. But then she meets Abe, the perfect stranger next door and suddenly life seems full of possibility and hope.

One day changes Mags’s life forever.

After years of estrangement from her family, Mags receives a shocking phone call. Her brother Abe is in hospital and no-one knows what happened to him. She meets his fiancé Jody, and gradually pieces together the ruins of the life she left behind. But the pieces don’t quite seem to fit…

~*~

After a mysterious beginning, the reader is introduced to Mags and Jody, the sister and the fiancé of the victim, Abe. Beginning where they meet at the hospital following Abe’s fall, Mags meets Jody as the fiancé she never knew about, and a myriad of stories and reasons for her brother’s injuries that are explained away as an accident. Frustrated, Mags starts digging deeper into the lives of the other residents of the charity home her brother has been living in to uncover what really happened. As the story unfolds, secrets of each character are revealed, and one character’s past is cleverly revealed through third person flash backs amidst the first person narrative that do not directly identify whose story is being told. The big question hanging over this novel: Was Abe pushed and murdered, did he fall or did he commit suicide? And who will find out and reveal all?

Both Mags and Jody come from troubled, broken backgrounds – and show how each has dealt with them – where one is completely broken and child-like, the other is assertive and overly confident, even a bit pushy. It was an interesting way to illustrate the outcomes of abuse, and how people are treated based on biases and perceptions of them, and in a subliminal way, how wealth and money can influence outcomes and ensure the victim feels at fault – unless the truth comes out.

It was the kind of novel where as a reader, I was constantly at odds with whom to like and believe – which is the purpose of a psychological thriller. In a way, all the characters were playing games and hiding secrets, and most, such as Jody, appeared to have a reason to, and past horrors that impacted their current story line.

Following a path of twists and turns to the conclusion, the story shows just how flawed the act of manipulation of people and the law can be, and that people can move past a trauma, and show that they are more than who people assume they are based on a few stories of hearsay to protect the reputation of those who have the power.

It leaves much open to interpretation as well – and you may find your thinking about whom the victim is and who the suspect is will be questioned at some stages. Why would some characters be hiding the truth? As these facts are revealed, the path towards those who did not commit the crime but are merely witnesses becomes clearer, though the suspect is left as a shadowy figure for quite a while. It is cleverly done, as is the finale of the novel, and the ending that feels hopeful for both Jody and Mags.

An intriguing novel, that slowly reveals the true nature of the main characters and how they interact with each other, and what makes them who they are. If you enjoy thrillers, this is an intriguing novel to pick up.

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Stasi Wolf by David Young

Stasi wOLF.jpg

Title: Stasi Wolf (Karin Müller #2)

Author: David Young

Genre: Historical/Crime and Mystery

Publisher: Bonnier Zaffre/Allen and Unwin

Published: 22nd February 2017

Format: Paperback

Pages: 416

Price: $29.99

Synopsis: How do you solve a murder when you can’t ask any questions?

East Germany, 1975. Karin Müller, sidelined from the murder squad in Berlin, jumps at the chance to be sent south to Halle-Neustadt, where a pair of infant twins have gone missing.

But Müller soon finds her problems have followed her. Halle-Neustadt is a new town – the pride of the communist state – and she and her team are forbidden by the Stasi from publicising the disappearances, lest they tarnish the town’s flawless image.

Meanwhile, in the eerily nameless streets and tower blocks, a child snatcher lurks, and the clock is ticking to rescue the twins alive…

~*~

Set during the height of the Cold War and East Germany, under the control of the Stasi and communist influence, Stasi Wolf is the second in the Karin Müller series. Oberleutnant Müller, a member of the People’s Police, is sent to Halle-Neustadt to investigate the disappearance of infant twins. Forbidden by the Stasi to publicise the disappearance so the flawless image of Halle-Neustadt remains intact, Karin and her team run into a series of problems and roadblocks that prevent them from completing the job in a timely manner. As the months pass, the child snatcher hides in plain sight amongst the nameless streets, and a much larger mystery is lurking in the shadows of the missing twins.

The world of Stasi Wolf shows East Germany thirty years after the end of World War Two, under Soviet and Communist control. It is a world that Karin Müller has grown up in, and as a member of the People’s Police, struggles against doing what is right for the nation, what the Stasi demand, and working to resolve cases of missing children, at times having to use subversive methods to get by the watchful eye of the Stasi, especially Malkus, the Stasi officer in charge of Halle-Neustadt, vetting every move Karin and her team make in the search for the missing babies. It is a story full of twists and turns, that shows hints of the past at times, and these hints are slipped in effectively and in a way that keeps the reader guessing.

The development of Karin’s character is excellent too – from the hints at what happen to her during her training, to her family dynamic and the scenes that give the reader a glimpse into her past, and what made her the person she is in the novel, and the way she uses these past experiences to subvert the orders she is given. Her ability to find a way to bypass the orders shows that she is creative and innovative – as much as she can be in a Communist run state.

I thought that the suspense and pace of this book were well written. The scenes that flicked back and forth in first person held much mystery, and added to the thickening plot and case that Karin was investigating. Another nice surprise was the side story of Karin’s relationship with the doctor, Emil. It didn’t take over the rest of the story, and was effective, and tied in nicely with the eventual conclusion of the story. It is a gripping story that ensnared me and captured my attention, wanting to know what happened next, and what kind of person would kidnap twins, and why.

David Young has captured the characters well, and the hints he leaves about some of the characters creating a well-thought out sense of mystery, and his backdrop of the Stasi controlled East Germany ensured a story that had many twists and turns, and complex and flawed characters, in a world where knowing who to trust was hard. It was a great novel, and I hope the series will continue.

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The Falls by B Michael Radburn

thefallscover

 

I received a copy from the publisher for review

 

Title: The Falls

Author: B. Michael Radburn

Genre: Fiction/Crime Fiction

Publisher: Pantera Press

Published: August, 2016

RRP: $29.99

Format: Paperback

Pages: 364

Synopsis: A week of despair… a century of evil

Damaged but not yet broken, park ranger Taylor Bridges believes his ghosts are in the past – until a raging forest fire in an isolated canyon of The Falls lays bare the remains of a young woman… and a decade-old killing ground.

After the police enlist Taylor in their investigation, the evidence bizarrely points to a deranged preacher who reigned over The Falls a century ago.

But when a crucial witness and a policewoman disappear, it’s clear that a disciple of The Falls’ dark history is on the loose.

 

~*~

 

The Falls by B. Michael Radburn is the second book in the Taylor Bridges series. Still reeling from the death of his daughter Claire five years ago, The Falls follows on from The Crossing, and Taylor’s struggle with the disappearance and death of Claire. When the daughter of an old friend and her partner stumble across a body whilst exploring the Christiana Goldmine in Eldritch Falls, Taylor is called in to assist the police in the national park. Taylor must grapple with his guilt about Claire, and the emotions that this new case brings to the surface. As the case progresses, links to a string of ritualistic murders that span one hundred years. These murders become linked to a family who has lived in the area for generations, a family determined to keep the secrets of the past hidden away from prying eyes, whatever the cost may be.

The daughter of Taylor’s friend, Aroha, becomes involved as a witness and later, is taken. Taylor and the police must find her before it is too late, and before other lives are endangered during the search for truth and its war with keeping secrets and continuing a legacy that has been in place for over one hundred years.

Michael Radburn has created a story using the natural environment and the fear of the unknown, or the fear of what we don’t understand. This gives the characters, both good, bad, and in between, concrete and believable motivations and desires that drive the story towards its relieving conclusion where the reader can finally take a deep breath and relax after the fast paced ride.

This was my first adventure with Taylor Bridges, and I found that I did not need to have read the first book to enjoy this and understand what drove the characters. The mine and the bush of country Victoria was the perfect setting for this mystery, a place where anything could happen. Where shadows dance at the edges of the darkness, and where fear takes over. The novel kept up a good pace and kept me reading as long as possible to find out what happened, and to find out who survived and who didn’t. It is a story where people aren’t always what they seem, and that speaks to the human condition and its various degrees of sanity, desire and wanting to please people, but also, human desire for belief, and legacy. A haunting tale that will keep you up at night, I enjoyed reading this book, and hope that further books are forthcoming and will be just as intriguing as this one.