Tales from the Bush by May Gibbs and Jane Massam

TALES-BUSHTitle: Tales from the Bush
Author: May Gibbs and Jane Massam
Genre: Children’s Fiction/Picture Book
Publisher: Scholastic Australia
Published: 6th February 2017
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 24
Price: $19.99
Synopsis: Available now from Scholastic Australia, Tales from the Bush is the next book available in the ‘Tales from’ series of stories inspired by May Gibbs lovable Australian bush characters, celebrating 100 years of Gumnut Babies.
Join Snugglepot and Cuddlepie for some wonderful adventures in the Australian bush. Fall in love with May Gibbs’ classic characters as they go camping in search of treasure, garden with Little Ragged Blossom and deal with mischievous Mrs Snake!
This beautifully illustrated storybook is perfect for shared reading before bedtime and introduces children to the beauty and diversity of the Australian bush.
All royalties from the sale of May Gibbs products support the work of The Northcott Society and Cerebral Palsy Alliance in providing services to Australian children living with disability and their families.

~*~

aww2017-badgeIn the third book of the series, Tales from the Bush, Snugglepot and Cuddlepie search for treasure, left behind by a Banksia man (who are big in this book, but the ones they encounter are not bad), on the riverbank, following footprints to find the gold of years past, and instead, find a much more valuable treasure that they will always have. Then, they plant a garden with Little Ragged Blossom, their new friend, from a necklace of what they thought had been berries, and create a world of beauty for her.
When the Bush Dance is about to be held, they encounter Mrs Snake, whose mischievous ways have caused everyone to abandon her, and Mr Lizard to revoke her invitation to the Bush Dance. These charming stories are full of friendship, and the undying kindness and curiosity of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie that generations of Australian children have come to adore. They are a delightful bedtime read, and great tool to help children learn to read and gain confidence whilst learning about the Australian bush, and its flora and fauna. The fantastical elements that these stories and the originals have brought to the wildlife and wild flowers of Australia, in a world that many have written about over the years, and a world that is as much a part of the Australian identity as other parts of our history and literature.
I enjoyed reading this book – for me it was a quick read and I think it is an ideal book for children learning to read. This series captures the original magic of May Gibbs for a new audience and readership in a new century where technological toys compete with books for our attention.

Buy the books here:

https://www.maygibbs.org/

or here:

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Tales from the Gum Tree by May Gibbs and Jane Massam

TALES-GUM-PB.jpgTitle: Tales from the Gum Tree

Author: May Gibbs and Jane Massam

Genre: Children’s Fiction/Picture Book

Publisher: Scholastic Australia

Published: January 2016

Format: Paperback

Pages: 24

Price: $14.99

Synopsis: Oh my!‘ cried Snugglepot. ‘I’m flying, I’m really flying!‘ He couldn’t believe he was up in the big blue sky, and it was simply glorious.

Join Snugglepot and Cuddlepie on their enchanting adventures through the Australian bush. With amazing butterfly rides, boating escapades and a surprise moonlight pageant, prepare to fall in love with May Gibbs’ classic characters. A new story based on May Gibbs’ enchanting Gumnut Babies characters.

Perfect for ages 3 to 6.

~*~

 

aww2017-badgeThe first in the Tales from…series, (the second Tales from The Billabong, was reviewed prior to this one), Tales from the Gum-Tree reunites readers with Snugglepot and Cuddlepie, in a story aimed at early readers, and introduces new readers to a world that has never been out of print since it was first revealed to Australians at the height of the First World War.

 

The new series of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie stories use the same charm and style of the originals, for new and old readers alike. Where the originals can be read by confident readers of any age or to younger readers, this series can be read to children and to help teach them to read through the simple language used to tell the mesmerising tales of the bush that May Gibbs loved.

 

In these tales, Snugglepot and Cuddlepie embark on a variety of escapades, where they watch dragonfly races, where brave bush racers ride dragonflies in an epic race, much to the delight of Snugglepot, who wishes to join in, and the horror of Cuddlepie, whose desire to stay in the safety of the boughs of the gum tree loses against his curiosity. A boat ride across the creek sees them in need of warming themselves by a comforting fire, and lost during the night, after a feast with the possums, they stumble across a moonlight pageant in their search for the perfect birthday present for Mrs Kookaburra. These three short tales are perfect to read to young children, or as a tool to help them learn to read when they are ready, and they will learn to identify native Australian animals as they read.

 

 Buy the book here:

https://www.maygibbs.org

or at Booktopia:

or through Angus and Robertson Bookworld:

Tales from The Billabong by May Gibbs and Jane Massam

tales from the billabongTitle: Tales from the Billabong

Author: May Gibbs and Jane Massam

Genre: Children’s Fiction/Picture Book

Publisher: Scholastic Australia

Published: September 2016

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 24

Price: $19.99

Synopsis: ‘Go, Snugglepot!’ Cuddlepie was at the sidelines, cheering wildly for his friend. Snugglepot was in the lead! ‘Whee!’ Snugglepot exclaimed, tingling from the top of his head to the very tips of his toes. He had never gone so fast before. 

Join Snugglepot and Cuddlepie on their enchanting adventures through the Australian bush. With an exciting billycart race, leapfrog fun and a dazzling firefly ball, prepare to fall in love with May Gibbs’ classic characters.

~*~

aww2017-badgeSnugglepot and Cuddlepie have charmed generations of Australian children for generations. The two little Gum-Nut babies and their other flower, and bush baby friends, together with Mrs Kookaburra and Mr Lizard, race in the Billabong Cup, fly a kite, and attend the Firefly Ball. The mischievous brothers embark on new adventures, in the same world that author May Gibbs created for them to introduce them to a new generation and to continue the stories that so many of us grew up on, loved and for many, would have been our first introduction to Australian literature, the Australian bush and an imagined world of beauty, untouched by humans. The Billabong they live by is untouched, and full of beauty. The language used combined with the May Gibbs original illustrations and the newer ones in the same style evokes the original stories and the beauty of the Australian bush. It is Snugglepot and Cuddlepie’s home- and it is the place that has inspired many Australian authors over the years. May Gibbs is just one of these wonderful authors whose legacy continues to inspire and help people today through The Northcott Society and Cerebral Palsy Alliance.

This is the first picture book I have reviewed on the blog, as I mostly review novels and longer fiction, but the chance to promote a much-loved Australian author such as May Gibbs to new readers in Australia and across the world as the centenary of the Gum-Nut Babies and Snugglepot and Cuddlepie approaches, coinciding with the final years of the First World War Centenary. Some propaganda posters had Gum-Nut Babies on them, contributing to the popularity and transcendence of these characters – something I hope to discuss more in future posts about May Gibbs and these books.

The stories and characters that May Gibbs created are unique to Australia. In this new book, Snugglepot and Cuddlepie are given a breath of new life, and will be an excellent companion to the Gum-Nut Babies, and The Adventures of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie.

Buy May Gibbs books here:

https://www.maygibbs.org/shop/

 

Book Review and Giveaway: The Gum Nut Babies by May Gibbs

GB-CE.pngTitle: Gumnut Babies Centenary Edition

Author: May Gibbs

Genre: Children’s Literature

Publisher: HarperCollins Australia

Published: 1916, Centenary Edition 2016

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 272

Price: $39.99

Synopsis: Beautiful new Centenary edition to celebrate the publication of May Gibbs’s first book, Gumnut Babies, in 1916. May Gibbs’s marvellous creation – the Gumnut world, with its tiny heroes and heroines and deliciously villainous villains – has fascinated generations of children since its first publication in 1916. Gumnuts at the races, at the ballet, and dancing at balls are some of May’s exquisitely illustrated scenes that have delighted us all. This beautiful new edition has been produced to mark the centenary of Gumnut Babies and contains the stories of Gum-nut BabiesGum-Blossom BabiesFlannel Flowers and Other Bush BabiesBoronia BabiesWattle Babies, plus Nuttybub and Nittersing and Chucklebud and Wunkydoo. This is the perfect companion for The Complete Adventures of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie.

~*~

The Gum Nut Babies by May Gibbs are a staple of an Australian child’s literary diet, and they have been for over one hundred years. In this exquisite edition, each poem is reproduced with accompanying original artwork for each type of Gum Nut and Blossom baby, and the stories of Nuttybub and Nittersing, and Chucklebud and Wunkydoo are reproduced, as May Gibbs wrote them, for a new generation. In these stories, Nittersing and Nuttybub go on adventures around the bush, searching for each other, and enlisting the help of fellow animals against the Big Bad Banksia men, who try to destroy the peace of all the other animals and bush babies, whose fear of the Big Bad Banksia men is perhaps more than their fear of Humans, a threat that is heard about but not seen. Instead, they must find away to beat the Big Bad Banksia men, as must Chucklebud and Wunkydoo in their various adventures.

aww2017-badgeEach pair inevitably becomes separated and they battle the perils of the bush to find each other again in two charming stories, told by one of Australia’s most adored authors. At the back, there is a small biography of May Gibbs, a contemporary of Beatrix Potter of the Lakes District, and author of the Peter Rabbit tales. As I have mentioned in the other reviews for these books, so there will be some overlap, May Gibbs is Australia’s Beatrix Potter, both interested in conservation and their natural surrounds at a time of great change and upheaval in their countries, as the city of Sydney, in particular the area of Neutral Bay, grew up around Nutcote, where May Gibbs lived – her answer to Hilltop.

These books are delightful to read at any age, and I hope will continue to charm and capture the imaginations of children for many generations to come. They are the sorts of books that deserve to stay in print. Published during the last years of World War One, at a time when Gum Nut babies were also used as propaganda to show support for the war, and encourage patriotism in a time when it was waning. However, the Gum Nut Babies of these stories do not go to war, but off on grand adventures that children dream of heading off on.

As a child, these would have been amongst the first Australian stories I was exposed to, and have always been something I have loved. May Gibbs has taken the natural environment she knew and loved, and created a magical world that children and adults can escape to, and spend some time away from the trappings of modern life, and learn about various types of native wildlife and plant life in a fun and exciting way.

This post is part of the May Gibbs centenary celebrations, and the May Gibbs brand is running a giveaway for the next two weeks via my blog to win a copy of this book. Enter below and good luck!

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Buy the book here:

https://www.maygibbs.org/

The Green Mill Murder by Kerry Greenwood (Phryne Fisher #5)

Title: The Green Mill Murder

Author: Kerry Greenwood

Genre: Crime

Publisher: Allen and Unwin

Published: February 2005

Format: Paperback

Pages: 276

Price: $22.95

Synopsis: Phryne Fisher’s fifth mystery intrigues with excitement, glamour, murder, dance halls and blackmail.

Dancing divinely through the murder and mayhem of her fifth adventure, the elegant Phryne Fisher remains unflappable.

Gorgeous in her sparkling lobelia-coloured georgette dress, delighted by her dancing skill, pleased with her partner and warmed by the admiring regard of the banjo player, Miss Phryne Fisher had thought of tonight as a promising evening at the hottest dancehall in town, the Green Mill.

But that was before death broke in. In jazz-mad 1920s Melbourne, Phryne finds there are hidden perils in dancing the night away like murder, blackmail and young men who vanish.

Phryne Fisher’s fifth adventure leads to smoke-filled clubs, a dashingly handsome band leader, some fancy flying indeed across the Australian Alps and a most unexpected tryst with a gentle stranger.

Independent, wealthy, spirited and possessed of an uninhibited style that makes every one move out of her way and stand gawking a full five minutes after she walks by Phryne Fisher is a woman who gets what she wants and has the good sense to enjoy every minute of it!’ Davina Bartlett, Geelong Times

~*~

In her fifth adventure, Phryne finds herself dancing her feet away at a dance marathon where the prize on offer, a car, would ensure a wonderful future for the winner. A night of what began as frivolous dancing, ends in murder, and Phryne is drawn into the case yet again, assisting Detective Inspector Jack Robinson as she endeavours to uncover the murderer, and another case, involving a returned serviceman, whose noted absence has caused quite some alarm in the family. Following the trail of the case to help a young couple caught up in the confusion, and taking on more work to track down the serviceman, Phryne’s adventures yet again see her tango with death and danger, all whilst maintaining the elegance and with the same gusto and exuberance that strikes fear into the heart of her maid, Dot. Phryne must use all of her talents to solve this one, and ensure the best outcome for all.

The late 1920s, with the world on the brink of The Great Depression, half a decade away from Hitler rising to power in Germany, and a decade out from what would become The Second World War, Phryne’s world is one of uncertainty for some, a generation scarred and tainted by a war that took thousands of lives, eloquently shows the divide between classes at the time, and drops hints at the political situation of the time – where Communism was feared, and where women like Phryne were a mystery, a shock and an interest to many. In each story, Kerry Greenwood has shown this world as it was – not in an idealised way, but in a way that touches on the discomfort felt during these times in an accessible way to a modern audience. Phryne’s cases often involve everyday people, unlike the Rowland Sinclair series, which is steeped in even more history and politics, as well as murder during the 1930s, but this works for the series, and each story can be read in isolation or consecutively from one through to twenty. It is a delightful series, and the fifth novel is no exception, taking Phryne to greater heights as she flies over the Australian Alps to solve a case.

Here, she spends time with the missing serviceman, and encounters a wombat with a one track mind when it comes to potatoes – a fact that might just come in handy later. Stuck in the wilderness of the Alps, Phryne must band together with Vic, the ex-serviceman to survive and arrive home in one piece to hear about Dot’s outing to a ball with her beau, Constable Hugh Collins.

In true Phryne style, she tackles brothers pushed to the brink by mothers, mothers who are good at putting on a show to manipulate people, and a host of other characters from the grateful and understanding to the harried and snarky, whose attitudes do little to worry and distract Phryne, whose ability to adjust her behaviour and speech patterns from class to class, and city to country, makes her somewhat of a chameleon. Phryne gets better and somewhat naughtier with each book, and she always finds herself in the wrong place at the right time, much to the horror of her maid and most of the police force, apart from Jack, who seems quite taken with her guts and bravery, and willingness to help out. Where the police often cannot got, Phryne does, and she certainly helps them solve the cases in each book, and ensures the best outcome possible.

She Be Damned by MJ Tjia

She be Damned_Front_Cover.jpgTitle: She Be Damned

Author: M.J. Tjia

Genre: Historical Crime

Publisher: Pantera Press

Published: 1st August 2017

Format: Paperback

Pages: 251

Price: $29.99

Synopsis: London courtesan or professional sleuth?

London, 1863: Women in Waterloo are turning up dead, their sexual organs mutilated and removed. When another girl goes missing, fears grow that the killer may have claimed their latest victim.

The police are at a loss and so it falls to courtesan and professional detective, Heloise Chancey, to investigate.

With the assistance of her trusty Chinese maid, Amah Li Leen, Heloise inches closer to the truth. But when Amah is implicated in the brutal plot, Heloise must reconsider who she can trust, before the killer strikes again.

~*~

The popularity of amateur sleuths, historical crime and cosy crime means that there has been an explosion of these books of late – reviving the days of Agatha Christie and her characters, Poirot and Miss Marple, and joining the ranks of The Honourable Miss Phryne Fisher, Rowland Sinclair and modern amateur sleuths such as Mma Precious Ramotswe and Inspector Ashwin Chopra (Retd) in their quests to rid the world of criminals and crime. The latest, just as unique character to join them is Heloise Chancey, a courtesan in London during the 1860s, who is called upon to discreetly look into cases for some of London’s important people, or into the cases that nobody really worries about. Heloise becomes embroiled in a murder mystery about prostitutes turning up dead, minus their sexual organs in Waterloo when a young girl in the upper classes, Eleanor, goes missing. Her father and Sir Thomas, Heloise’s employer, believe she has met the same fate as the prostitutes, and employ Heloise, and require the utmost discretion, as she can go places that the police cannot, or will not. Together with her maid and companion, Amah Li Leen. Together, they will inch closer to the truth – but when Amah is embroiled in the plot, Heloise must use all of her wits to find the real culprit before they strike again.

BW Mirandi TjiaDebut novels, especially for a series, are crucial to establishing the character and style of the story and the author to the reader. They cement the setting for readers and with any luck, have them wanting more – often the mark of a series that will be successful and gain a loyal following. Heloise Chancey’s debut ensures that she has a place as a character and the author, M.J. Tjia, will have fans who will eagerly await her next book. It didn’t take me long to read this one, and I quite enjoyed it. It had strong characters, revealed their histories slowly, and still left some questions unanswered for future books, and allowed the reader to unfold the story with the protagonist, which is often quite fun in mystery stories, and allows the pacing to move along effectively.

In an engaging plot, M.J. Tjia’s characters become their own entity, each with their own flaws and strengths that make them engaging. Heloise is as stubborn as she is elegant, Amah is as snarky and sarcastic as she is honourable and faithful. Together, they work, and though Amah is at times disdainful of Heloise’s chosen occupation, she nonetheless puts up with her antics, whilst delivering some harsh truths to her mistress and ensuring she has done her best to prevent disasters happening to Heloise during her adventures and investigations.

True to the Victorian period, the male characters overwhelmingly concern themselves aww2017-badgewith Heloise’s delicate feminine sensibilities – sensibilities that Heloise doesn’t have, nor does she subscribe to, leaving the men quite shocked that she doesn’t faint all the time, whilst still maintaining her standing and the characteristics of a Victorian lady. She is, at the same time, appropriate for the time period, whilst standing out and away from the societal expectations of the time, ensuring a strong character with an intriguing story. I hope that Heloise has more stories and more secrets to come, and I await her further adventures eagerly.

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A Dangerous Language by Sulari Gentill (Rowland Sinclair #8)

Flat Cover_Gentill_ADL_2017Title: A Dangerous Language

Author: Sulari Gentill

Genre: Crime Fiction

Publisher: Pantera Press

Published: 1st October 2017

Format: Paperback

Pages: 384

Price: $29.99

Synopsis: Set against the glamorous backdrop of the 1930s in Australia and overseas, A Dangerous Language is the latest in the much loved, award winning Rowland Sinclair Mysteries.

When Rowland Sinclair volunteers his services as a pilot to fly the renowned international peace advocate, Egon Kisch, between Fremantle and Melbourne, he is unaware of how hard Australia’s new Attorney-General will fight to keep the “raging reporter” off Australian soil. In this, it seems, the government is not alone, as clandestine right-wing militias reconstitute into deadly strike forces.

When a Communist agent is murdered on the steps of Parliament House, Rowland Sinclair finds himself drawn into a dangerous world of politics and assassination.

A disgraced minister, an unidentified corpse and an old flame all bring their own special bedlam. Once again Rowland Sinclair stands against the unthinkable, with an artist, a poet and a brazen sculptress by his side.

~*~

A Dangerous Language by Sulari Gentill marks book number thirty eight in my Australian Women Writer’s challenge for 2017, and as usual, has not failed to impress and of course, distress at times. Now in 1934, inching closer to the threat of war, Rowland is in Melbourne, purchasing a new car to replace his beloved Mercedes, that met with destruction in the almost fatal car race of the previous book, Give The Devil His Due. The trip back from Melbourne with Clyde Watson Jones and Milton Isaacs, an artist and poet whose political allegiances, especially on Milt’s account, have put Rowland in his brother’s firing line of anguish, should be uneventful. However, their sojourn through Canberra, where they are to meet Edna, Milt stumbles across the body of a Communist on the steps of Parliament House – an event that beings the tumultuous venture to get Egon Kisch into Australia, and speaking out against the Fascist tendencies that Rowland and his friends witnessed in Germany in Paving the New Road. When Rowland’s brother, Wilfred, comes onto the scene, Rowly must do whatever he can to keep his plans to help Egon away from his conservative brother – who nonetheless knows that the Fascists are dangerous. Even so, the big brother is also keen to pry his mostly apolitical brother away from the influence of those Rowland chooses to keep company with.

aww2017-badgeIn this eighth venture, politics begins to have a larger focus than in the previous seven novels, where it was present, but had less impact on the plot. In this novel, it seems nobody is safe from the clashes between each side – this is what makes the novel gripping, as it ensures that those who hurt Milt and Rowly (poor Rowland was in the wars a bit in this one again) are shrouded in mystery. As always, I enjoy the Rowland Sinclair novels, and this one was two years in the waiting, and rightly so in the end, because it captured the political turbulence and environment of the 1930s in a way that is accessible to those just discovering it, and highlighting some aspects and characters that are perhaps less well-known than others during this time.

Fiction often offers parallels to history or contemporary times, and it is not hard to see BW_Author_Photo_Gentill_2016how the dangerous language that Rowland and his friends opposed in 1934 from Fascists and the conservatives of the time is repeating itself today. The feelings of powerlessness that the ordinary people had against those in politics and with influence that can encourage this dangerous language Rowland dislikes are felt through Milt and Clyde throughout the novel, and in particular Clyde during a boat cruise from Fremantle to Melbourne, where they must ensure Egon gets to Melbourne safely, and in Traveller’s Class, Rowland is able to get Egon as far as possible on his trip. The social class contrast between Rowland and his friends appears even more so in this book, where class and politics have become crucial to the evolution of the plot and characters at the stage of the series. The history of this turbulent period is woven into the plot and is sometimes the motive behind the crime, such as in A Dangerous Language. I also enjoy the inclusion of historical figures and people throughout that had an impact on history – this gives the stories an authenticity to them that is both exciting and informative at the same time.

As always, Rowland takes a few hits from people trying to cover up their crime, or another secret, and his brother Wilfred, battle-weary by now from saving the family name, is still faithful to Rowland, if a bit pompous at times. I do feel for Rowly when Wilfred loses his temper, as so often happens when Rowland stumbles into something he didn’t intend to. As polar opposites, Sulari has created exceptional characters in the Sinclair family, and their friends, including the heartbreak that Rowland’s own mother doesn’t recognise him, but sees him as his long-dead brother, Aubrey, an ongoing theme throughout the series that Rowland takes in his stride, and that Sulari has written exceptionally well. The Rowland Sinclair series is one that gets better with each subsequent mystery, and the uniquely Australian settings are in themselves a character – from Woodlands estate in Sydney, to the family property at Yass, and each place Rowland and his friends visit. They are often the unwilling detectives at first, dedicated to their art and friendship, but also dedicated to speaking out when and where they need to, to ensure that the dangerous language that Egon Kisch is trying to warn against does not infect the way of life that many in Australia enjoy. Once they are involved in the crime, it seems they cannot help themselves, and Rowland, as an honourable person, is always at hand to warn Colin Delaney of new information they stumble across.

An excellent addition to this series, and I look forward to the next one, which will hopefully be out soon!

Buy the new Rowland Sinclair and the rest of the books in the series here: