Archibald, The Naughtiest Elf in the World Visits Santa by Skye Davidson, illustrated by Ágnes Rokiczky

NJ1828-ETP-Archibald-Santa-book-cover-300x240.jpgTitle: Archibald, The Naughtiest Elf in the World Visits Santa

Author: Skye Davidson, illustrated by Ágnes Rokiczky

Genre: Picture books, children’s books, Christmas stories

Publisher: Elephant Tree Publishing

Published: December 2018

Format: Paperback

Pages: 30

Price: $20.00

Synopsis: Archibald is the naughtiest elf in the whole wide world, who loves nothing more than doing extremely mischievous things, all with very good intentions. Let him help you discover new worlds and ideas, as you follow him on one of his many exciting adventures.

~*~

Living in Bland Land is very boring for Archibald, a young elf who always seems to be getting into trouble. even though his cheeky deeds are always done with the best intentions. One day he discovers that a new shop will be opening in town – a very exciting shop for Bland Land – a toy shop, and it’s opening on Christmas Eve. When the zookeeper from the previous book spies Archibald peeking in the windows, he warns him against naughty deeds. But poor Archibald can’t help it – his heart is in the right place, but his execution always lands him in trouble.

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After meeting two homeless girls, Archibald hatches a plan to help them with Santa – a very good deed where he is not as naughty as everyone thinks. But will Archibald’s plan work?

The second in the series, kindly sent to me by Elephant Tree Publishing, is just as charming as the first, and it is quite a timely arrival as I am trying to do some Christmas reading and viewing in the lead up to the big day. Adding this to the series is absolutely lovely and makes for excellent Christmas Eve reading alongside classics such as The Night Before Christmas.

In this story, Archibald isn’t as naughty as he is in the first, though this is referred to, tying the series together neatly and tidily for children, and any readers who have read the first book but who also might be picking up the series for the first time with this book – one image from the previous book appears in this one, which makes those bonds and ties stronger and keeps them relevant for readers.

I am in love with Archibald and his adventures, and his Christmas one is full of heart, and is very touching – he uses his cheekiness for good this time – something very good and through these stories, shows children how they can take care of each other and the world around them in a fun, educational way – with a touch of magic from an elf!

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The Final Bingo – Bingo Card Two

Book bingo take 2

Book Bingo Twenty-Five – The Final Bingo – A forgotten classic, a book based on a true story, and a book written more than ten years ago.

 

Wow, that came around quickly! Our final Book Bingo Saturday with Theresa Smith Writes and Mrs B’s Book Reviews for 2018. And to finish the year off, I have completed two bingo cards, and have filled a few squares in this one with one or two from the last card, but that were in different squares – the majority were different books, but all read across the past twelve months.

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The final three squares I had to fill in were a forgotten classic, a book based on a true story, and a book written more than ten years ago – of the three, I used one book from the previous card, because it fit a few squares and it worked out well to ensure all the squares were taken up. Two of these books were Australian, and the third that fits in the book published more than ten years ago is a Christmas story, giving this post a touch of Christmas at the right time of year.

 

little fairy sisterTo begin, the square for a forgotten classic is taken up by a husband and wife writer and artist team – Ida Rentoul Outhwaite, who drew the pictures, and her husband, Grenbery Outhwaite, who wrote the text to the story The Little Fairy Sister. A uniquely Australian story yet at the same time, filled with the European fairy story traditions that young children in the colony would have grown up with. These traditions were transplanted into an Australian environment where both traditions are recognisable by readers. This book was one that I had not heard of until recently, despite my research and studies into the fairy tale tradition – it had never come across my radar in quite the same way as Arthur Rackham did, for example. Many people are familiar with Rackham, and other European illustrators and fairy tale collectors and writers, and there are several Australian authors that when mentioned, people will recognise. But Ida and Grenbery are often not mentioned, and perhaps should be mentioned more and more Australian fairy stories should be brought to life and light for a new generation to enjoy.

The-Tattooist_FCR_Final

My second book filled the square in the first card for a book that scared me. Usually, this would be interpreted as horror or a thriller, monsters and demons. Yet for me, it is what humans can do to other humans that scares me. It is the human ability to harm and kill, to torture mentally and physically for pleasure, and to harm – and this book was The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris. This time, it fills in the square of a book based on a true story. It tells the story of Lale Solokov, and how he survived Auschwitz, where he met his wife, by becoming the person who would tattoo the numbers onto all the prisoners as they were brought into the camp during the years it ran during World War Two. Heather Morris has fictionalised Lale’s story, but it is no less harrowing, scary and upsetting – and now, whenever I read about Auschwitz and the tattoos, I wonder how many of those people – Lale would have encountered during his time as the tattooist.

 

the-nutcrackerEnding on a lighter note, a Christmas story has been chosen to fill the square labelled a book published more than ten years ago – The Nutcracker by Alexandre Dumas, published in 1844. It tells the story of Mary, who is given a nutcracker doll one Christmas by her Godfather Drosselmeyer, and her toys come to life, and take her on a journey through a fantasy realm of magic, and dolls, and fairies in a wholly different realm, where she takes on the Mouse King and finds out where she belongs in the realm. It takes place at Christmas, which is rather appropriate for this post, seeing as it is almost Christmas, and in the approaching weeks, I am hoping to read some Christmas books and watch some Christmas movies to get in the mood, and the Nutcracker has started this process.

 

These final three books have concluded my challenge, apart from my wrap up post in a few weeks for the bingo challenge. Below is the text list of the books I read for this stage. Both lists will be included in the wrap up post.

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Challenge #4: Book Bingo Take 2

(Rows Across)

Row #1 – – BINGO

A book set more than 100 years ago: The Gypsy Crown by Kate Forsyth (Chain of Charms #1) – AWW2018

A book written more than ten years ago: The Nutcracker by Alexandre Dumas

A memoir: No Country Woman by Zoya Patel – AWW2018

A book more than 500 pages: The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton – AWW2018

A Foreign translated novel: The Distance Between Me and the Cherry Tree by Paola Peretti

 Row #2 – BINGO

A book with a yellow cover: Australia Day by Melanie Cheng – AWW2018

A book by an author you’ve never read before: If Kisses Cured Cancer by T.S. Hawken

A non-fiction book: Amazing Australian Women: Twelve Women Who Shaped History by Pamela Freeman and Sophie Beer – AWW2018

 A collection of short stories: Fairy Tales for Feisty Girls by Susannah McFarlane – AWW2018

A book with themes of culture: Relic of the Blue Dragon (Children of the Dragon #1) by Rebecca Lim – AWW2018

Row #3:  – BINGO

A book written by an Australian woman:Disappearing Act by Jacqueline Harvey (Kensy and Max #2) – AWW2018, The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton – AWW2018

A book written by an Australian man: Captain Cook’s Apprentice by Anthony Hill

A prize-winning book: Chain of Charms series by Kate Forsyth – 2007 Aurealis Award for Best Children’s Fiction – AWW2018

A book that scares you: What the Woods Keep by Katya de Becerra – AWW2018

A book with a mystery: The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes (Mitford Murders #1)

 Row #4 – BINGO

A forgotten classic: The Little Fairy Sister by Ida Rentoul Outhwaite and Grenbery Outhwaite

A book with a one-word title: Wundersmith by Jessica Townsend – AWW2018

A book with non-human characters: A Home for Molly by Holly Webb, Beast World by George Ivanoff

A funny book: Archibald, the Naughtiest Elf in the World Goes to the Zoo by Skye Davidson, Illustrated by Ágnes Rokiczky -AWW2018

A book with a number in the title: We Three Heroes by Lynette Noni – AWW2018

 Row #5 -BINGO

 A book that became a movie: Victoria and Abdul: The Extraordinary True Story of the Queen’s Closest Confidant by Shrabani Busi

A book based on a true story: The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris – AWW2018*

A book everyone is talking about: Lenny’s Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee – AWW2018

A book written by someone under thirty: The Yellow House by Emily O’Grady – AWW2018

A book written by someone over sixty: Miss Lily’s Lovely Ladies by Jackie French – AWW2018

 Rows Down

Row #1 – – BINGO

 A book set more than 100 years ago: The Gypsy Crown by Kate Forsyth (Chain of Charms #1) – AWW2018

A book with a yellow cover: Australia Day by Melanie Cheng – AWW2018

A book written by an Australian woman: Disappearing Act by Jacqueline Harvey (Kensy and Max #2) – AWW2018

A forgotten classic: The Little Fairy Sister by Ida Rentoul Outhwaite and Grenbery Outhwaite

A book that became a movie: Victoria and Abdul: The Extraordinary True Story of the Queen’s Closest Confidant by Shrabani Busi

Row #2 -BINGO

 A book written more than ten years ago: The Nutcracker by Alexandre Dumas

A book by an author you’ve never read before: If Kisses Cured Cancer by T.S. Hawken

A book written by an Australian man: Captain Cook’s Apprentice by Anthony Hill

A book with a one-word title:Wundersmith by Jessica Townsend – AWW2018

A book based on a true story: The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris – AWW2018

 Row #3: – BINGO

 A memoir: No Country Woman by Zoya Patel – AWW2018

A non-fiction book:Amazing Australian Women: Twelve Women Who Shaped History by Pamela Freeman and Sophie Beer – AWW2018

A prize-winning book: Chain of Charms series by Kate Forsyth – 2007 Aurealis Award for Best Children’s Fiction – aWW2018

A book with non-human characters: A Home for Molly by Holly Webb, Beast World by George Ivanoff

A book everyone is talking about: Lenny’s Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee – AWW2018

 Row #4 -BINGO

 A book more than 500 pages: The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton – AWW2018

A collection of short stories: Fairy Tales for Feisty Girls by Susannah McFarlane – AWW2018

A book that scares you: What the Woods Keep by Katya de Becerra – AWW2018

A funny book: Archibald, the Naughtiest Elf in the World Goes to the Zoo by Skye Davidson, Illustrated by Ágnes Rokiczky -AWW2018

A book written by someone under thirty: The Yellow House by Emily O’Grady – AWW2018

 Row #5 – BINGO

 A Foreign Translated Novel: The Distance Between Me and the Cherry Tree by Paola Peretti

A book with themes of culture: Relic of the Blue Dragon (Children of the Dragon #1) by Rebecca Lim – AWW2018

A book with a mystery: The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes (Mitford Murders #1)

A book with a number in the title: We Three Heroes by Lynette Noni – AWW2018

A book written by someone over sixty: Miss Lily’s Lovely Ladies by Jackie French – AWW2018

 

In the next few weeks, I will be writing wrap up posts of my reading challenges overall, and each one, including my book bingo challenge, leading up into 2019 and within the first week of January, I will be aiming to start each new challenge for the new year and introduce those on my blog – perhaps with a challenge that has more open categories for one of them as there were some books that I was unable to get to as the categories were overly specific which made it much harder (trying to find an author with my first or last name was rather impossible in one challenge).

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The Christmas Tale of Peter Rabbit by Emma Thompson, based on the original tales by Beatrix Potter

christmas tale of peter rabbit.jpgTitle: The Christmas Tale of Peter Rabbit
Author: Emma Thompson, based on the original tales by Beatrix Potter.
Genre: Children’s Fiction
Publisher: Warne/Penguin Random House
Published: 19th November 2018
Format: Hardcover/Board book
Pages: 72
Price: $16.99
Synopsis:. A wonderful new board book edition of The Christmas Tale of
Rabbits are always very uppity during the Christmas season, and Peter Rabbit was no exception.’
Emma Thompson continues the adventures of Peter Rabbit in this board book edition of a super new Christmas tale. It is almost Christmas and Peter Rabbit cannot contain his excitement. After he upsets yet another bowl of mincemeat, Mrs Rabbit sends Peter on an errand. He bumps into his cousin, Benjamin Bunny, and a feathered friend who makes an alarming announcement which throws Benjamin and Peter together in a race against time and the scary McGregors.
And so, our Christmas Tale begins…
Will the friends’ rabbity ingenuity save their friend from an unsavoury end?
Brilliantly told by Emma Thompson and charmingly illustrated by Eleanor Taylor, Peter Rabbit is back with a hilarious cast of characters. This time our story is set in Beatrix Potter’s beloved Lake District.
Emma Thompson, Oscar-winning actress and screen writer is a long-time admirer of Beatrix Potter’s tales. She has a talent for creating engaging narratives with a dry humour similar to Potter’s own and is the perfect choice of author for this new Peter Rabbit tale.

~*~

Rabbits love Christmas, so the stories go, and as has been witnessed by Beatrix Potter. Of course, the most well-known of rabbits is no exception, and he has revealed it to none other than Emma Thompson, Nanny McPhee and Professor Trelawney herself (amongst many spectacular roles in other films) – for a new generation – and let’s face it – anyone who grew up on the original tales as well. In this story, Peter and Benjamin cross paths – as they inevitably do in the other tales – gathering items for Christmas for their mothers. Together. they decide to have a bit of fun and follow William the Turkey into the Great Forbidden Place – Mr McGregor’s Garden! We all remember the line from the original, where Mrs Rabbit warns her delightfully good girls – Flopsy, Mopsy and Cottontail -and naughty little boy – Peter – not to enter Mr McGregor’s garden lest they meet the same fate as their father – being baked into a pie by Mrs McGregor.
And of course, this is where the fun and laughter start, as William tells Peter and Benjamin that Mrs McGregor has been feeding him quite well – as he is to attend Christmas dinner with the McGregors – just not in the way he thinks he will be. It is up to our brave little rabbits to break it to William that in fact, he is not to be a guest, but the main meal. And so, what follows is a series of attempts to hide William and save him from the slaughter. All their attempts are comical, seeing as they are very small rabbits, and William is a very big, fat turkey. It is their eventual success that brings joy to the animals, and they rush home for their rabbity Christmas.
Emma Thompson’s writing style matches Beatrix Potter’s so well, I cannot imagine who else would be the right person to take on the challenge of reinvigorating these beloved characters, and the illustrator, Eleanor Taylor, captures the magic of the original Beatrix Potter water colours too, with vibrant colours that evoke the old stories.
This charming tale, with the happy, and funny ending, ensures laughter and delight for the holidays, and a return to nature and the world of Peter Rabbit, the charming, yet naughty bundle of fur we all love.

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christmas tale of peter rabbit.jpg

The Nutcracker by Alexandre Dumas

the-nutcracker.jpegTitle: The Nutcracker (Barnes & Noble Leather-bound Pocket Editions)

Author: Alexandre Dumas

Genre: Historical Fiction, Fantasy

Publisher: Barnes and Noble Inc/Fall River Press

Published: 1st September 2018

Format: Leather bound

Pages: 152

Price: $19.99

Synopsis: Discover the real story behind the Disney holiday film, The Nutcracker and the Four Realms, and the famous Nutcracker Christmas ballet, as told by Alexandre Dumas

‘How could you imagine, silly child, that this toy, which is made of cloth and wood, could possibly be alive?’

The nutcracker doll that mysterious Godfather Drosselmeyer gives to little Marie for Christmas is no ordinary toy. On Christmas Eve, as the clocks strike midnight, Marie watches as the Nutcracker and her entire cabinet of playthings come to life and boldly do battle against the evil Mouse King and his armies.
But this is only the start of the tale.

Read on for enchantment and transformation; enter a world by turns fantastical and sinister, a kingdom of dolls and spun-sugar palaces, and learn the true history of the brave little Nutcracker.

~*~

The Nutcracker is one of those stories that is inexplicably linked to Christmas, whether it is the E.T.A Hoffman version, Tchaikovsky’s ballet, one of the many movie adaptations, including the upcoming Disney film, The Nutcracker and the Four Realms, and finally, the version being reviewed here, by Alexandre Dumas, who also wrote The Three Musketeers. Marie, or Mary as she is referred to in this version, is given a nutcracker doll for Christmas by Godfather Drosselmeyer, but unlike her doll, Clara, is magical, and when the clocks strike midnight on Christmas Eve, Marie watches the Nutcracker and her dolls come to life, battle the evil Mouse King, and take Marie/Mary on a journey through a world of magical dolls, and sugar-spun palaces, and many more realms that show the fantastical and sinister world that the Nutcracker is truly a part of.

The Nutcracker is one of those stories – whether in the written form, a movie or as the ballet – that is quintessentially linked with Christmas, much like A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, and the associations with a world of magic and toys often sung about in a myriad of Christmas songs, and is one of those stories that sets the mood for Christmas perfectly and nicely. Originally published in 1847 as The History of a Nutcracker, this new edition introduces people to the Nutcracker anew as they go in a journey with Mary/Marie (depending on which translation and author you read) through the world that the Nutcracker, the toys and the Mouse King inhabit – a magical world of wonder and joy, where Mary/Marie is destined to help the Nutcracker bring order back to the world and kingdoms she enters in her dreams.

For a long time, I only knew of the Nutcracker as a ballet by Tchaikovsky, and have the score, or at least, the main piece of music, somewhere. I also knew about it from a movie I once saw, so when I found it as a novel, I knew I had to read it, and I was not disappointed. It really sets the mood for Christmas and is entertaining – though Mary is admonished for staying up after midnight on Christmas Eve, it is the magic of the world Mary/Marie enters, and that the reader enters too. Reading this book has really put me in the mood for Christmas and the new Nutcracker movie coming out later this month, just in time for Christmas.

I’m getting ready to do some Christmas reading of other books and the usual movies, but read this one early so I could see the movie after reading it. I look forward to seeing the movie and reading this book again soon.

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Book Bingo Two: A book with a number in the title, a book based on a true story, a book by an Australian woman

 

AWW-2018-badge-roseThe next square I managed to fill was the last square in the fourth row a book with a number in the title. This also filled in a book published in 2018 for my other challenge and ticked off another book in the Australian Women Writer’s challenge – I have many books that will fill some categories in book bingo and the other challenge, but I am aiming for a different one for each category if I can.

 

For square twenty, I read Four Respectable Ladies Seek Part Time Husband by Barbara Stoner, which I reviewed on the 29th of January on this blog, and has been linked to this post.

four respectable ladies

 

Sent to me by Penguin Random House, I was pleasantly surprised by this book, and its focus on the female characters and their determination to get help where needed but when things went wrong, they banded together to help each other without needing husbands to do it all for them. My previous book bingo book, Rose Rave

nthorpe Investigates, would have fit into this category also, and they would both have fit into a book by an Australian woman, though each square needs its own book, as I will show in my final post when I have hopefully filled the entire square.

 

mr dickensI have managed to check off three other squares as well. For square twenty-two, a book based on a true story, I read Mr Dickens and His Carol by Samantha Silva, about Charles Dickens journey writing A Christmas Carol, and why he wrote it – more out of economic need than desire to write such a story. And square eleven, a book by an Australian woman, has been filled by The Tides Between by Elizabeth Jane Corbett, an historical fiction novel using storytelling and fairy tales to capture an arduous journey across the seas.The-Tides-Between-300x450

 

Look out for my next book bingo due in two weeks.

 

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Mr. Dickens and His Carol by Samantha Silva

mr dickens.jpgTitle: Mr. Dickens and His Carol

Author: Samantha Silva

Genre: Historical Fiction

Publisher: Faber Factory Plus/Allison and Busby/Allen and Unwin

Published: 22nd November 2017

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 320

Price: $24.99

Synopsis: ‘A charming, comic, and ultimately poignant Christmas tale about the creation of the most famous Christmas tale ever written. It’s as foggy and haunted and redemptive as the original; it’s all heart, and I read it in a couple of ebullient, Christmassy gulps.’ Anthony Doerr, bestselling author of All The Light We Cannot See

For Charles Dickens, each Christmas has been better than the last. His novels are literary blockbusters, avid fans litter the streets and he and his wife have five happy children and a sixth on the way. But when Dickens’ latest book, Martin Chuzzlewit, is a flop, the glorious life threatens to collapse around him.
His publishers offer an ultimatum: either he writes a Christmas book in a month, or they will call in his debts, and he could lose everything. Grudgingly, and increasingly plagued by self-doubt, Dickens meets the muse he needs in Eleanor Lovejoy and her young son, Timothy. With time running out, Dickens is propelled on a Scrooge-like journey through Christmases past and present.
Mr. Dickens and His Carol is a charming, comic, and ultimately poignant Christmas tale about the creation of the most famous Christmas tale ever written. It’s as foggy and haunted and redemptive as the original; it’s all heart, and I read it in a couple of ebullient, Christmassy gulps.’ Anthony Doerr, bestselling author of All The Light We Cannot See

~*~

Mr Dickens and His Carol by Samantha Silva focuses on what drove Dickens to write his most famous story, A Christmas Carol in 1843. In this novel, Dickens has been approached by his publishers, whose grave news of the failure of Martin Chuzzlewit over in America starts to eat away at him, and his usually charitable donations he gives out. For economic reasons, they encourage Dickens to write a Christmas story. In Silva’s version, these events happen not long before Christmas, with the book published days before Christmas. Silva has Dickens go through a similar transformation to Scrooge, though his reasons for wanting to cut back are presented as economic struggles rather than a selfish desire for money. On his journey, Dickens encounters the homeless and impoverished children of London, and a young woman named Eleanor Lovejoy, and her son, Timothy – who inspire the version we know and love today.

This fictional retelling of how Dickens came to write one of the best loved Christmas stories in the world draws from threads of information and biography that the author collected, and showed that someone many people depended on, a man whose heart was big, could be crippled by the very thing his books made social commentary about: poverty, or near poverty. Dickens was plagued by debts at the time, but the demands on his aid and from family didn’t stop – nor did they take him seriously in the novel when he said he couldn’t help. For Dickens, a chance meeting with the Lovejoys gives him the inspiration he needs to write the book that people all around the world know and love today: A Christmas Carol.

The London that Dickens inhabits leaps from the page, fog and all, just as it is in his books. His time alone with the Lovejoys is akin to the journey of Scrooge in A Christmas Carol, where Dickens finds his way back to family and Christmas, and the magic in his heart that makes him the kind and generous man everyone knows he is. It is a heart-warming story, and portrays Dickens as merely human, a man who just likes to write and wants the best for his family, but also feels pressure from outside forces to do everything and please everyone. As an aspiring author, one line stuck with me, where Dickens is talking to his publishers and they are telling him what audiences want. His response about writers having to be told what to write by an audience even then shows the pressure authors are under to please an audience of readers. Despite this attitude, Dickens ended up writing a wonderful story that illustrates what Christmas is about, and the meaning of family and humanity, reflecting the attitudes of what it meant to be rich and poor in Victorian London.

I enjoyed this, even though it was a fictional reimaging of the journey Dickens took to write A Christmas Carol because it allowed an insight into what kind of journeys a writer goes on, and how they come to write certain books. The fog, and the cobblestones were as real as the figures that populated Dickens world and the young pauper boys who followed him around, wanting to put on a play of his work, and wanting to be immortalised as characters on the page. Silva has used research and her imagination in a wonderful union to recreate this time in Dickens’ life, and I will be aiming to read it again this coming December, alongside my other Christmas books.

I read this after Christmas as it arrived in early January from Allen and Unwin, but it is one that will make a great Christmas read, and enjoyable to read beside A Christmas Carol. I loved this book and I think fans of Dickens, lovers of Christmas and literature will enjoy this delightful book.

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Father Christmas’s Fake Beard by Terry Pratchett

Title: Father Christmas’s Fake Beard

father christmas beard

Author: Terry Pratchett

Genre: Short Stories, Christmas, Children’s Fiction

Publisher: Penguin/Double Day

Published: 16th October 2017

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 204

Price: $29.99

Synopsis: Have you ever wanted Christmas to be different?

Turkey and carols, presents and crackers – they all start to feel a bit . . . samey.

How about a huge exploding mince pie, a pet abominable snowman, or a very helpful partridge in a pear tree? What if Father Christmas went to work at a zoo, or caused chaos in a toy store or, was even, arrested for burglary!?

Dive into the fantastically funny world of Terry Pratchett, for a festive treat like no other. These ten stories will have you laughing, gasping and crying (with laughter) – you’ll never see Christmas in the same way again.

~*~

As the first Terry Pratchett I’ve read, Father Christmas’s Fake Beard was a delightful one to start with. In a series of stories appearing together for the first time in the same collection, Father Christmas’s Fake Beard gives the Christmas holiday a sense of whimsy and humour that differs from so many other Christmas stories we know and love. Within these stories, the treasured and much-loved Christmas icons have been used by Pratchett in new and inventive ways to create entertaining Christmas stories, from a story about Father Christmas’s Fake Beard, told in a series of memos between the store he works at, him and those in charge, to a story about the Twelve Gifts of Christmas, based around the song, where a Prince finds a way to give a Princess twelve different gifts, and finally, a story about Father Christmas trying to find a job to do during the other months of the year he’s not delivering gifts over Christmas. Aimed at children, these stories can be enjoyed by all ages, as each reader and age group will connect with these and the meanings will be different to everyone. Being able to see the hints and nods to traditional Christmas and other aspects within the stories was enjoyable.

From this first encounter of Terry Pratchett’s work, I look forward to reading some more of his work. A posthumous publication, this evokes the magic of Christmas and the unique humour of Pratchett – and as a first time reader, I think makes an intriguing and wonderful introduction to his world of writing.

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