Isolation Publicity with Petra James

 

Due to recent events, many Australian authors have had to cancel book launches and festival appearances. For some, this means new novels, series continuations and debut novels are heading into this scary, strange world without much publicity or attention. The good news is, you can still buy books – online or get your local bookstore to deliver if they’re offering that service. Buying these books, talking about them, sharing them, reading them, reviewing them – are all ways that for the next six months at least, we can ensure that these books don’t fall by the wayside.

Over the next few months, a lot of us will be consuming some form of art – entertainment, movies, TV, radio, music, books – the list goes on. It is something we will be turning to to take our minds off things and to occupy vast swathes of free time. One of the things I will be doing to support the arts, and specifically, Australian Authors, will be reading and reviewing as many books as possible, conducting interviews like this where possible, and participating in virtual book tours for authors.

Petra James is the author of the Hapless Hero Henrie series, and the second book came out in May in the midst of the pandemic. Part of her publicity for this book is the following interview we arranged ages ago, just after I read the first book for Writing NSW. This interview was done before the advent of online events, so doesn’t reflect the changes that other authors have made.

Hi Petra and Welcome to The Book Muse
It’s lovely to be here – thank you.

1. The second book in your Hapless Hero Henrie series is out in May – what is the basic premise of this novel?

Henrie is on her first Hero Hunt – with Alex Fischer from Hapless Hero Henrie and a girl called Marley Hart, who has rung the Hero Hotline seeking a hero. There’s a mystery about Marley’s great aunt Agnes (an archaeologist), a missing gold statue, a secret from the past, and a new villain.

2. How many books do you think you have planned for Henrie Melchior’s story?

At the moment, it’s just the two books but Violetta Villarne (from Villains Inc) has a habit of popping up when she’s least expected so I wouldn’t be surprised if she has more to say and do. She loves making trouble …

3. This is one I’m really looking forward to after getting to review the first book for Writing NSW earlier this year. Where did the idea for House of Heroes come from – a family where no girls have been born for decades?

Thank you so much for your wonderful review of Hapless Hero Henrie. I’m thrilled you enjoyed it.

I’m the youngest of four girls and I was supposed to be a boy but, obviously, I wasn’t so I grew up with this sense that I wasn’t quite who I was supposed to be. I took this idea to the extreme by wondering what dramatic events could be set in motion if a girl was born into a family business, governed by tradition, and males.

I also wanted to reclaim the hero space for girls because, of course, girls can be heroes too!

4. What, if any, events and appearances did you have planned for the release of this book before the pandemic crisis forced their cancellation?

We’d really just started talking about this when COVID struck but I was hoping to attend some bookshop book clubs, visit some schools ….

5. Out of all the characters you have created, do you have a favourite, and why this character?

This is always a tough question to answer. I guess each new character is like a new friend so there’s a joyful sense of discovery as you get to know each other. So Henrie is probably top of the list at the moment because she’s the main character of my latest book. But then all the characters in my other books are like old friends, and old friends are equally cherished.

6. How did you get your start in children’s publishing, and what is your job within the industry these days?

I worked for a literary magazine in the UK when I left university and soon realised that publishing was the job for me. I loved every part of it. And still do. I’m a children’s publisher now – working with amazing authors, illustrators and designers. I feel pretty lucky to have such a job.

7. Do you have a favourite children’s book, series or author, or many, and what are they?

I have so many favourites. For so many different reasons. This question could take me months to answer. And I’d probably want to keep changing it. It would be like the Magic Pudding of answers – I could never ever finish it.

8. How do you think children’s books and stories have changed over the years, compared to what you may have read as a child?

I think there’s a much greater range of stories now with so many more authors writing for children. I think humour is more prevalent too.

9. Growing up, what sort of books did you find yourself drawn to in particular, and why?

I loved all the Enid Blyton books, especially the Famous Five and the Secret Seven. I planned for a while to be a spy. And Ferdinand the Bull was my favourite picture book, probably because my dad loved this story and read it to me constantly.

10. What was it about the arts, writing and publishing that made you want to make a career in this industry?

It was a serendipitous discovery. I feel as though it found me rather than the other way around. And once in the publishing/writing world, I knew no other career could ever fit so well.

11. Can you tell us what is next for Henrie and the House of Melchior?

That is a question without an answer … for the moment.

12. In times like these, how important do you think the arts are going to be for people so they can get through it?

Creativity is fuel for the soul. Our physical worlds may have shrunk but the world inside a book is immense. We may not be able to leave the house but we can still explore the most magnificent inner worlds by reading, singing, dancing, playing the ukulele, writing, haiku-ing …

Anything I may have missed?

Thank you Petra, I look forward to more Henrie Melchior stories.

Thanks so much to you and I hope you enjoy Henrie’s Hero Hunt.

Kensy and Max: Freefall by Jacqueline Harvey

kensy and max 5Title: Kensy and Max: Freefall
Author: Jacqueline Harvey
Genre: Adventure
Publisher: Puffin
Published: 3rd March 2020
Format: Paperback
Pages: 400
Price: $16.99
Synopsis: Where do you draw the line when your family and friends are in grave danger? Do you take action even though it means ignoring the rules?
Back at Alexandria, with their friend Curtis Pepper visiting, Kensy and Max are enjoying the school break. Especially when Granny Cordelia surprises them with a trip to New York! It’s meant to be a family vacation, but the twins soon realise there’s more to this holiday than meets the eye.
The chase to capture Dash Chalmers is on and when there’s another dangerous criminal on the loose, the twins find themselves embroiled in a most unusual case. They’ll need all their spy sensibilities, along with Curtis and his trusty spy backpack, to bring down the culprit.

~*~
Kensy and Max are on their summer break at Alexandria with their grandmother and Song, and new friend from Sydney, Curtis Pepper when they’re summoned to New York! A family vacation – how fantastic! Only…it’s not. When whispers of Dash Chalmers coming to find his family arise, Kensy and Max find their family and themselves in the middle of a race to keep Dash from finding his family and uncovering the culprit behind the poisonings from letters and parcels.

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At the same time, Dame Spencer has her own reasons for including Curtis – she sees him as a possible recruit and spends much of the novel assessing him – we know from the blurb on the back that Curtis is a recruit being considered by Dame Cordelia Spencer. Kensy, Max and Curtis must work together to find out what is going on and who is behind it – and why all the adults around them are suddenly so secretive.

AWW2020The Kensy and Max series gets more and exciting as it goes on, and each book should be read in order – some characters pop in and out of the series, the books refer back to previous events, but don’t give a full recap of what has come before, and there are new things to learn all the time that need to be connected to the previous stories. The codes and ciphers are always fun too – in this one, Jacqueline uses the A1Z26 code – where each letter of the alphabet is represented with the numbers one to twenty-six in that order.

Be swept up in a New York adventure as Kensy, Max and Curtis hone their spy skills, and seek to uncover the person who has been sending poison through the postal system. This is yet another highly addictive adventure in the Kensy and Max series, and as more secrets and hints at why the family is constantly targeted are revealed, we get closer to finding out why Anna and Edward had to go into hiding for so many years.

Kensy and Max: Freefall ramps up the action in the final chapters, where everything seems to happen quickly and seamlessly as Kensy, Max and Curtis get caught up in finding out who they’re after and saving Tinsley and her children, and many other people. It has the perfect balance of humour and action, and I love that Kensy and Max get to be who they are, but are growing and changing across the course of the series. This is a great addition to the Kensy and Max series, filled with continuity and in jokes, and a new take on the spy novel that has a fresh take on the world of spies and their training and gadgets. I am looking forward to Kensy and Max book six when it comes out.

Books and Bites Bingo Fairy Tale Collection: Snow White and Rose Red: And Other Tales of Kind Young Women by Kate Forsyth and Lorena Carrington

books and bites game card
I’m moving through this challenge a bit slower than I’d like – for several categories I do have the books, I just need to read them. For others, I’m waiting for the right or specific book to arrive. One square I might struggle to fill is the book I keep putting off, as I don’t intentionally put a book off if it’s on my TBR or shelves. In a way I am because I have been working on a strategy to get through everything.

SnowWhiteCover copy

Back to this post though, I had a few ideas of what I was going to read, and I finally settled on the latest in the long-lost fairy tale collection by Kate Forsyth and Lorena Carrington, Snow White and Rose Red – And Other Tales of Kind Young Women. This fulfilled several challenge categories, and was a much-anticipated book. It was released at the height of the pandemic, and so I invited Kate and Lorena to appear on my blog in an interview – I am biased in saying it is one of my favourite interviews of the series, because we chatted about fairy tales, writing and illustration processes and many other things about writing and Kate’s books.

This book is lovely – from the stories chosen and retold, to the beautiful layered, photographic and digital illustrations Lorena created to be paired with Kate’s magical and spellbinding words. It is a fantastic fairy tale book and I am glad I chose it for this square.

Tashi: 25th Anniversary Edition by Anna Fienberg, Barbara Fienberg and Kim Gamble

Tashi 25Title: Tashi: 25th Anniversary Edition

Author: Anna Fienberg, Barbara Fienberg and Kim Gamble

Genre: Fantasy

Publisher: Allen and Unwin

Published: 16th June 2020

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 112

Price: $16.99

Synopsis: Tashi’s adventures have been loved by children all over the world for twenty-five years. This special edition of the original Tashi book celebrates Tashi’s anniversary, and includes a story about Tashi’s first birthday, ‘Tashi and the Silver Cup’, and ‘Kidnapped!’ from Tashi’s Storybook.

OVER ONE MILLION COPIES SOLD!

For twenty-five years Tashi has been telling fabulous stories. He escaped from a war lord in a faraway place and flew to this country on the back of a swan. And he wished he would find a friend just like Jack. In this first book of his daring adventures, Tashi tells Jack about the time he tricked the last dragon of all. Now, a whole generation of readers will know that when Tashi says, ‘Well, it was like this …’ an exciting new adventure is about to begin. This special anniversary edition includes the stories ‘Tashi and the Silver Cup’ and ‘Kidnapped!’ together for the first time.

‘The Tashi stories are some of my all-time favourites: a world within a world and a magical place for children to lose themselves in.’ Sally Rippin, bestselling author of Polly and Buster and Billie B. Brown

‘All children should meet Tashi. He can be their mentor on the road to reading, feeding their imaginations with fantastic stories. The Tashi stories have the evergreen qualities of classics.’ Magpies

‘I read my kids Tashi – it’s this story that they love.’ Angelina Jolie

~*~

Tashi is one of those series of books that children have loved since it the first book was published back in 1995 – and was one of those books that was always out at the library! And then it felt like it disappeared – or maybe it was just always sold out or borrowed when I checked. So this is the first time I’ve been able to read an entire Tashi book, written by Anna and her mother, Barbara, and delightfully illustrated by the late Kim Gamble, who died in 2016. I remember meeting Kim at school at an illustrator visit and buying his book You Can Draw Anything – which I still have, and he signed it. He was lovely and encouraging – and we all knew him as ‘the Tashi illustrator’, because Tashi was so big at our school!

AWW2020

Anna and Barbara’s story about Tashi, and his adventures with dragons and giants, stories he tells Jack, are as well-known as many of the older stories and classics of childhood. It has a quasi-fairy tale/fantasy feel to it. Jack and his parents live in the real world, but Tashi is from another world where giants and dragons live, and where he has used his wits and tricks to get out of tricky situations and get back to his family. Anna and Barbara have told a whimsical and magical adventure for younger children about being brave, about family, and about friendship. Their words weave a special kind of magic around the reader. Even as an adult, I could feel the magic and wonder of the words just as they would be for younger readers.

The words are accompanied by Kim Gamble’s delightfully playful black and white illustrations that tell as much of the story as the words do and give life to the characters beyond the page. This is a delightful book that will enchant all ages and is sure to become an Australian classic that will be visited and revisited for generations to come.

 

Book Bingo Six 2020 Themes of Crime and Justice

Book Bingo 2020 clean

Welcome to the June edition of Book Bingo with Theresa Smith Writes and Mrs B’S Book Reviews. This time around, I am checking off Themes of Crime and Justice with the tenth book in the Rowland Sinclair series by Sulari Gentill, A Testament of Character.

Book bingo 2020

Rowly and his friends take a detour on their way home from China and find themselves in America looking into the death of an old friend of Rowly’s. As the story progresses, Rowly and his friends fall deeper into a mystery of deaths, and who killed Daniel, as well as who Otis Norcross is, and where he is. In terms of justice, it has more to it than just solving the crime. The justice system that gives certain people preferential treatment or deems certain proclivities criminal – and how Rowly and his friends help those they are working with deal with these issues in 1930s America. These issues are not always overt, but they are bubbling there and hinting at what is to come and why things are the way they are.

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I’m finding this book bingo a bit easier. It means that there is the chance that all books will be read, reviewed and scheduled long before December, which is a bonus in trying to get through it all easily.

 

Isolation Publicity with K.M. Kruimink, Vogel Award winner 2020

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Due to recent events, many Australian authors have had to cancel book launches and festival appearances. For some, this means new novels, series continuations and debut novels are heading into this scary, strange world without much publicity or attention. The good news is, you can still buy books – online or get your local bookstore to deliver if they’re offering that service. Buying these books, talking about them, sharing them, reading them, reviewing them – are all ways that for the next six months at least, we can ensure that these books don’t fall by the wayside.

image001

Over the next few months, a lot of us will be consuming some form of art – entertainment, movies, TV, radio, music, books – the list goes on. It is something we will be turning to to take our minds off things and to occupy vast swathes of free time. One of the things I will be doing to support the arts, and specifically, Australian Authors, will be reading and reviewing as many books as possible, conducting interviews like this where possible, and participating in virtual book tours for authors.

 

A Treacherous Country

 Katherine is the winner of the 2020 Vogel Award with A Treacherous Country, which I am really looking forward to reading and reviewing. This is one book that due to its secrecy due to the prize announcement, did not have much publicity planned, so this is one interview that is helping to get it out there. Katrina had some fun with these questions as all my participants have, and I enjoyed finding out about her book, and her reading  and writing life.

 

Hi Katherine, and welcome to The Book Muse

 

  1. First, congratulations on winning the Allen and Unwin Vogel’s Literary Award. Where did you hear about it, and what made you decide to enter?

 

Thank you very much, and thank you for including me in The Book Muse!

I’m not sure exactly where I heard about the Vogel’s; I’ve known about it for years. Every year I’ve thought to myself ‘Is this the year I enter?’ and last year was it. I had an infant daughter, and I was so exhausted I was hallucinating. I’d be sitting up in bed, holding the baby, and getting annoyed with my husband that he wouldn’t take her so I could sleep. He’d say, ‘Darling, the baby you’re holding is imaginary. I’ve got our baby. You can sleep.’ I really needed something to do with my mind, so I googled the Vogel’s and saw that I had about eight months until the deadline. I felt the value for me in entering would be in the deadline and the wordcount: it would really compel me to complete something. So I did! I needed a bit of structure in my life.

 

  1. Your winning manuscript, A Treacherous Country, was published this year – can you tell my readers about your book, and the history and people behind the story?

 

A Treacherous Country is set in Van Diemen’s Land in 1842. The narrator is a young Englishman who has been sent to find a woman called Maryanne Maginn, who was transported there decades before. He’s very pliable, though, and easily led, and has won a distracting pair of newfangled harpoons in a card game. Through the harpoons, he gets caught up in the world of shore-based whaling. On his journey, he reflects on the situation he left behind at home – the young woman he proposed to, and his family of origin – and comes to the point where he realises he has to adjust his perception of things, and make a decision. I like an air of mystery, and keeping some facts back, so the young man’s motivations are revealed slowly.

The whaling industry was in decline around the time I set my novel, because the species was being hunted out. Nowadays, however, southern right whales are being seen with increasing frequency in Tasmanian waters. I remember standing on a friend’s verandah and watching a whale and her calf slowly swim north. It spurred me to think about how long their memories are. They almost became metaphorical for me.

  1. Tasmania seems to be getting a lot of attention lately – what do you think it is about Tasmania that is sparking so many different stories?

 

I feel like there are probably many elements to this! A significant aspect of it, I think, is that being from a small place has a kind of distinction to it, just because it’s something you share with relatively few other people. If you add to that the fact that we’re on an island, this becomes intensified. The isolation is both physical and conceptual. That tends to make its mark on your identity, for better or worse.

Another is that Tasmania, in many ways, feels like a microcosm of a larger place: we have big stories, and deep, dark histories, but it’s all condensed into a small place, so it feels more immediate.

As for why it’s getting more attention lately…I do think that people are increasingly drawn to the relative seclusion and safety Tasmania seems to offer. There is a kind of comfort in being on a little island off a bigger island, tucked away in the Tasman Sea.

 

  1. The Vogel’s announcement had to be made online due to the COVID-19 pandemic – what other events did you have to cancel or put on hold surrounding publicity for your book?

 

It’s hard to say, because the secret nature of my book meant that we didn’t have much publicity lined up. The party was definitely the big one!

 

  1. Prior to entering the Vogel’s, did you think about submitting to other prizes or publishers?

 

Not this manuscript, because I wrote it specifically for the Vogel’s. But I have certainly submitted other (shorter) works for consideration elsewhere.

 

  1. What drew you into the genre of historical fiction, and is the story in A Treacherous Country based on known facts and stories, or did you go searching for these facts to craft your story?

 

I’m drawn to strong stories, rather than a particular genre. I love a story with resonance. I love it when things clunk into place, and you think ‘Ah, of course!’. It’s just that this story was necessarily grounded in the past.

It really did unfold organically for me. It’s not based on known stories, but I tried to be as factual as possible. I allowed myself great scope for invention, but checked up on every invention so that it would be rooted in plausibility – was it possible? How would it have looked? How would it have been explained?

 

  1. How important is authenticity of the voice of your story and characters to you, and by extension, the reader?

 

It’s pretty important. I wanted to create a natural-feeling world, inhabited by real and likely people. I wanted my narrator to feel familiar: like a tangible person who happens to be living at a certain point in time.

 

  1. When not writing, what do you enjoy doing?

 

I love walking, reading, and creative pursuits like knitting and drawing. I quite like cooking, but really only because I like eating and sharing food. I love a glass of wine, and movies. But listing all these things feels a bit like I’m pretending my life is this slow and elegant series of quiet pursuits. Mostly I’m playing froggies with my daughter – or horsies – or doggies…and enjoying the cognitive dissonance of eating golden syrup dumplings while wearing tummy trimmer jeans.

 

  1. Do you also read historical fiction, or do you prefer reading a different genre to the one you write in?

 

Yes, I love historical fiction! I don’t limit it to that, though. I love a compelling mystery. I love a good classic, or sci fi, or the kind of contemporary drama that inevitably gets described as ‘searing’ or ‘luminous’ or ‘searingly luminous’. Whatever’s good.

 

  1. Prior to entering this prize, had you written anything else, worked in the arts in another capacity, or is this novel completely different from what you had been doing previously?

 

Yes, I’ve had a couple of publications with the excellent Going Down Swinging, and a couple of other publications too long ago to mention. Both pieces I’ve published with GDS are set in the future, actually. One is set in a post-apocalyptic Hobart, and the other in an imagined sort of neo-noir neon city. This novel is different in genre, but similar in that I’m interested in the challenge of telling human stories within a context that creates a degree of remove – like the future or the past. I love anything with a sense of the strange.

 

  1. Do you have a preferred writing method?

 

I started typing ‘Half-drunk and at 3 am,’ but only out of habit. My twenties are over. I write on my laptop, and I’m good for short bursts. I might do forty-five minutes, go and make a cup of tea, and do another forty-five. Or an hour, and then a walk, and then another hour, and then binge-watch a whole season of Buffy. That kind of thing.

 

  1. How much research do you like to, or feel you need to do before putting the first words of the story onto paper?

 

I do it as I go. I tend to get the spark of inspiration from something, find the voice, and find the fabric of the story, and that leads me to the research I need to do. I love the different directions the research takes me. For instance, I did a lot of reading about language for this novel. There was a great deal of delving through quotations in the OED to check the use and age of various words and phrases. And then I found myself looking through old newspapers on Trove looking for advertisements to work out the prices of things, and what people found useful. Next I’d be looking at diagrams of rowing boats and sketches of different kinds of harpoons. And in between, always, writing.

 

  1. Do you have any favourite authors who have inspired you?

 

Oh god yes. For a while I was quite a derivative writer; I’d read something that got me so excited I’d race off and start writing in that style. That’s OK, that was just part of the process of finding my own voice. But writers like Hilary Mantel and Kazuo Ishiguro will always make me want to write like them!

 

  1. Now that you’re working in the arts, what is it like to be in this industry?

 

It’s wonderful, but I don’t think I can answer with any real depth because apart from small forays into publishing, this is new to me.

 

  1. Do you have a favourite bookseller and which books have they recommended to you that you have loved?

 

Hobart has some really great bookshops! There’s the Hobart Bookshop, Fullers, Cracked and Spineless, the State Bookstore…all favourites. I’m pretty self-directing when it comes to reading, so I can’t recall any specific recommendations, although I’m sure there have been!

 

  1. The cover of your book is amazing – what was it like the first time you saw it, and do you feel that it captures the essence of your story?

 

It was wonderful! I felt quite awestruck at the skill and style of Sandy Cull, the designer. It made the book feel more tangible. It was at a time when we were discussing changing the title, and seeing the new title in all its glory like that made me really feel like it was the right choice.

 

  1. You reference Greek mythology at the beginning of the novel – and Homer’s Odyssey – what bearing does this have on the novel?

 

There’s the obvious correlation of a person on a quest, and I’m sure other similarities could be drawn. But I’m not very fond of Odysseus! I don’t mean to downplay the importance of Homer (that would be silly), or the wonderfulness of the Odyssey and the Iliad, but I wouldn’t want to write about Odysseus. My narrator references the Odyssey because he has the scraps of classical knowledge that have come from being a well-brought-up but not particularly well-educated 19th century gent, and he doesn’t have much life experience of his own to rely on.

 

  1. Following on from the previous question, would you say this element suggests this is an Australian retelling of the Odyssey?

 

I wouldn’t say that, although I suppose any story of a journey might invite comparison to Homer. I suppose a key difference between my book and the Odyssey – apart from personality and stage of life – is that Odysseus is actively journeying home, and my narrator is journeying towards a less tangible end.

 

  1. How long did it take you to write this novel, from germination of the idea to the finished product?

 

About eight months, from when I googled the Vogel’s award to about twenty minutes before midnight on the final day it was open.

When I first started working on something to submit, I looked at a manuscript I’ve been working on for years. For my state of mind at the time, I actually found it too difficult – just not the thing that was really working for me. I found a little, unimportant side character I’d written about in that original manuscript, and expanded and developed his story into A Treacherous Country. So while it was new, the idea did grow from an older idea.

 

  1. Do you have more novels planned for the future?

 

I do! I’m working on that older manuscript I mentioned in the previous question. It means a lot to me, and I think about it a great deal. I just wasn’t in the right headspace for it last year. And there are other things on the go – it would never do to have everything finished and be able to get a good night’s sleep, after all.

 

Any comments about anything I may have missed?

 

 

Thank you Katherine, and best of luck with future writing,

 

 

 

Isolation Publicity with Maya Linnell

Due to recent events, many Australian authors have had to cancel book launches and festival appearances. For some, this means new novels, series continuations and debut novels are heading into this scary, strange world without much publicity or attention. The good news is, you can still buy books – online or get your local bookstore to deliver if they’re offering that service. Buying these books, talking about them, sharing them, reading them, reviewing them – are all ways that for the next six months at least, we can ensure that these books don’t fall by the wayside.

Over the next few months, a lot of us will be consuming some form of art – entertainment, movies, TV, radio, music, books – the list goes on. It is something we will be turning to take our minds off things and to occupy vast swathes of free time. One of the things I will be doing to support the arts, and specifically, Australian Authors, will be reading and reviewing as many books as possible, conducting interviews like this where possible, and participating in virtual book tours for authors.

 

low res Maya Linnell headshot LouiseAgnewPhotography

Maya Linnell is the author of several books about family dramas set in rural areas and writes what is referred to as rural romances – stories of romance that take place in rural settings, like farms and farming communities. Like many authors, Maya released a book in the midst of the pandemic, and as a result, lost out on all her appearances and launch events. Maya was still able to see her book released on the 2nd of June – some releases have been pushed back to later in the year, or even next year. Maya appears below to promote her book during these hard times.

Bottlebrush Creek front cover image

 Book: Bottlebrush creek

Release date: June 2 2020

Publisher: Allen &Unwin

 

Hi Maya, and welcome to The Book Muse

 

Lovely to be your guest Ashleigh, thanks for having me!

 

  1. First, can you tell my readers about your latest book, Bottlebrush Creek, and when it will be released?

 

Bottlebrush Creek hits the book stores on June 2 in paperback, eBook and audiobook. It’s pure escapism with plenty of on-farm family drama, troublesome tradies and a meddling mother-in-law. Angie McIntyre and her partner Rob embark on an ambitious owner build project in south west Victoria, but their dream build soon becomes the very thing that threatens to drives them apart. Bestselling author Victoria Purman described it as ‘A heart-warming, funny and poignant story about the joys and heartbreaks of country living. A winner!’

 

 

  1. When your book was released, what events did you have planned that had to be cancelled when COVID-19 hit?

Yes! I had events lined up from May to September, including panel events at Clunes BookTown Festival (Vic), The Romance Writers Australia conference (WA), Koorliny Arts Centre (WA) and Success Library (WA), the Northern Beaches Readers Festival (NSW) plus extensive events in bookstores and libraries across Victoria, SA, NSW, Queensland and WA.

  1. Both of your books are rural romances – what is it about this genre, where there seem to be many authors, that appeals to you, and that you think is so popular with authors and readers?

 

RuRo is such a great fit for me. I’ve always been a country girl, keen on telling the stories of rural people. My job as a journalist at a small twice-weekly newspaper provided a wealth of inspiration for conflicts and characters, so I’ll never be short of stories to tell. From a reader’s perspective, I think our city population has a nostalgia for country living, while those who are already enjoying the rural lifestyle can relate. What’s not to love about escaping into a book where days are spent in wide open paddocks, driving down quiet country roads, handling animals, producing food for the nation, and working with the seasons? And I think there’s something so special about guaranteeing readers a happily ever after, especially when there’s so much uncertainty in these everchanging times.

 

  1. When did you begin writing, and what made you decide to submit a novel for publication?

 

I’ve been writing stories since primary school, but it wasn’t until 2016 that I decided to have a crack at writing a novel. I enrolled in a ‘Write your First Draft course’ with Writers Studio Australia in 2016 and pitched the manuscript to publishing houses in 2018. It’s been my lifelong dream to be an author, so I was always writing my manuscript with the sole purpose of becoming published.

 

  1. What kind of research, if any, do you do for your books, or do you draw on your own experiences to build your characters?

I do a mixture of both to make sure my books are as authentic as possible. I find it easiest to write what I know, so I added in an owner-builder storyline to Bottlebrush Creek, called on childhood memories of helping at a friend’s dairy, and added in a few vintage bikes from my Dad’s beloved motorcycle collection. Research-wise, I ran the dairy scenes past a local dairy farmer to check for accuracy and updated technology, had my Dad read all the bike scenes, sought advice on small-scale cropping from a hobby-farmer, checked medical-related scenes with a nurse and called an expert from Ballarat Uni with questions about a feral animal sub-plot.

 

  1. You’re also a journalist – what publications and general areas do you write for?

 

I trained as a cadet at the South Eastern Times Newspaper in SA, and spent many happy years doing the rounds as a country journo, photographer and radio host. After the newspaper I moved into PR and now I spend my days writing for Allen & Unwin and blogging each month for Romance Writers Australia, but occasionally contribute to publications like The Owner Builder Magazine and The Victorian Writer, and take on contract communications jobs.

 

  1. Did your own experiences of motherhood and home ownership inform how you wrote Angie, Rob, Claudia and their overarching story?

 

Absolutely. Having spent three years building our own home (handmade bricks and all), I knew a renovation would add the perfect amount of action, drama and conflict. During the build, and the three years since, many people assumed my husband built the house and I simply watched from the sidelines, which couldn’t be further from the truth. This was one of the themes I explored in the novel, with a mix of ‘helpful’ locals, feuding family members and misbehaving animals adding an extra layer of strain to Angie and Rob’s new relationship. And I think as a mum, I think it’s impossible to write without drawing on my own experiences. There’s so many facets of everyday life to work with; the trouble with sleep patterns, the messes and mishaps and of course the joys.

  1. What other themes did you explore in Bottlebrush Creek and why?

As well as shining a spotlight on women in the workplace, I wanted to examine the dynamics of motherhood, changing relationships, community volunteerism, and the challenge of living next door to a very well-intended mother-in-law.

 

  1. When you’re not writing articles and rural romance, do you dabble in any other styles and genres?

 

After I’ve worked on my manuscript, finished any pending book reviews and author interviews for my blog (Kiss and Tell for Romance Writers Australia) and monthly newsletter, and updated my socials, I’m all tuckered out!

 

 

  1. Who are your favourite authors, or favourite books?

 

There are so many fantastic Aussie authors, it’s hard to choose but I love Natasha Lester, Fleur McDonald, Barbara Hannay, Fiona Lowe, Alli Sinclair, Victoria Purman and Rachael Johns. For overseas authors, I can never go past Marian Keyes, she writes with such humour and razor-sharp wit.

 

  1. Do you re-read these favourites?

 

I’m not a fan of rereading and rarely do so. Up until recently, I used to give books away as soon as I’d finished reading them, except for really, really special ones. Now that I’ve had two published, I’m more of a book hoarder – perhaps it’s because I now understand how much work goes into every novel!

 

  1. If you can, name the top five books you will always go back to in any genre.

 

Anne of Green Gables is one I’ve returned to several times – I read it as a child, listened to it on audiobook when breastfeeding my daughter, and then read it to my daughter when she was seven. Such a beautiful story.

 

  1. What does working in the arts industry mean to you?

It means putting my heart and soul into my writing, and hoping I create something that reaches out and touches people, makes them smile or makes them think. The messages I’ve received from happy readers has been the most unexpected and uplifting side of being a published author.

 

 

  1. Going forward, the arts – books, television, music and many other things – are going to be what gets us through these trying times. What would you say to people who think the arts don’t matter much or who want their art for free?

 

I read an excellent piece by Natasha Lester recently, and fully agree that now, more than ever, these are the times for stories. I think people wanting their arts for free should consider whether they’d expect a free bus trip, a free trolley of groceries delivered to their doorstep every week, free entry to the swimming pool/gym/football stadium, free fridges and freezers. Art is a unique product that requires a lot of time and dedication, and I’d hope people could put an appropriate value on that.

 

  1. What do you enjoy doing when not writing?

 

 

I’ve got three little bookworms and acreage, but when I’m not hanging with my family or writing, you’ll usually find me reading, baking (sweet things are my favourite, especially self-saucing pudding), sewing bright, colourful skirts for myself and my girls, learning piano or gardening (dahlias and roses are my favourite).

 

 

  1. Finally, do you have any tips for aspiring writers or journalists?

There are so many book launches online during the pandemic, which means aspiring writers can tune into a different book launch almost every day of the week. It’s the perfect way to understand more about the process of writing a novel, different writing routines and if they don’t share their publication story, you can simply ask! I’ve watched loads of launches and author events in the last three months, and it’s quite fun learning the different career highlights, inspirations, and the story behind the story.

Thank you Maya, and good luck with your writing!

 

Thanks so much Ashleigh!

 

BLURB:

 

Bottlebrush Creek is a sparkling rural romance of changing relationships and family ties from bestselling author Maya Linnell.

 

Between managing a bustling beauty salon, hectic volunteer commitments and the lion’s share of parenting two-year-old Claudia, Angie McIntyre barely has time to turn around. And with each passing month, she feels her relationship with fly-in, fly-out boyfriend Rob Jones slipping through her fingers.

When Rob faces retrenchment, and the most fabulous fixer-upper comes onto the market, Angie knows this derelict weatherboard cottage will be the perfect project to draw their little family together.

There’s just one catch: the 200-acre property is right next door to Rob’s parents in south-west Victoria.

It doesn’t take long for rising tensions to set a wedge between the hard-working couple. Angie and Rob have to find out the hard way whether their grand design will draw them closer together or be the very thing that tears them apart.

 

 

 

BIO:

 

Maya Linnell
Maya Linnell was recently shortlisted as the ARRA 2019 Favourite Australian Romance Author for her bestselling rural romance debut Wildflower Ridge. Her second novel Bottlebrush Creek is out June 2, with both stories gathering inspiration from her rural upbringing and the small communities she has always lived in and loved.

A former country journalist and PR writer, Maya now prefers the world of fiction over fact and blogs for Romance Writers Australia. She loves baking up a storm, tending to her rambling garden, and raising three little bookworms. Maya lives on a small property in country Victoria with her family, her menagerie of farm animals and the odd snake or two.

Follow Maya on Instagram and Facebook @maya.linnell.writes

Purchase her new novel Bottlebrush Creek here

Or sign up to her monthly newsletter at www.mayalinnell.com/newsletter

 

Elementals: Battle Born by Amie Kaufman

Battle BornTitle: Elementals: Battle Born
Author: Amie Kaufman
Genre: Fantasy
Publisher: HarperCollins Australia
Published: 1st June 2020
Format: Paperback
Pages: 320
Price: $17.99
Synopsis: The much-anticipated finale to Amie Kaufman’s epic middle-grade trilogy
Though Anders and his friends have delayed a war between the ice wolves and scorch dragons, their mission isn’t over. With adults on both sides looking for them, they’ve sought refuge in Cloudhaven, a forbidden stronghold created by the first dragonsmiths. The ancient text covering Cloudhaven’s walls could be the key to saving their home – if only the young elementals could decipher it.
To make matters worse, Holbard is in ruins and its citizens are reeling. Many have been forced into bleak camps outside the city, and food is running short.
To rebuild Vallen, Anders, Rayna, and their allies must find a way to unite humans, ice wolves, and scorch dragons before they lose their last chance.
In the final book of international bestselling author Amie Kaufman’s sensational adventure series, Anders and Rayna must put everything on the line – and the price of peace may hit closer to home than they could’ve ever imagined.

~*~

Anders and Rayna – twins with ice wolf and dragon blood, and raised with humans – and their friends have thus far delayed a war between the elementals and humans. But they are all hunted, and seek refuge in Cloudhaven, where they hope they can convince each faction, each side, to prevent a war, and rebuild their home, Vallen after uniting wolves, dragons and humans.

This is their last chance – can it be done?

I was sent this to review by HarperCollins – and was worried I wouldn’t be able to engage without having read the first two, but enough was hinted at and revealed that I could follow the story – but perhaps reading it in order is a better way to do so, and that is something I might go back and do eventually.

What I did read, though, was thoroughly enjoyable for readers – it captures the sense of war and rebellion and diversity – from appearance to hidden characteristics. This shows that diversity comes in all forms – and all of it – what we see, what we don’t, and everything in between – is what makes our worlds – real and imagined – richer and more enjoyable and relatable for a wide variety of readers. It shows that the world is diverse – much more diverse than some literature shows. Anyone can relate to these characters – there are aspects about each character that someone might see themselves in and I think Amie did it very well and set it in a world that is both fantastical and has echoes of what has happened and what is going on in our world today. Themes of racism and discrimination are woven throughout how people treat the wolves and dragons, and how they treat each other. A message like this, especially in these trying times when the world has been turned upside down in so many ways.

 

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It is a story about prejudice – what it is, rethinking it and facing it – and forcing change to make a better world for everyone. When the characters in the Elementals series find out what they believed is not true, they must face up to these and change their way of thinking. It is a powerful book and conclusion to the series that can be read by all those who enjoy the series, middle grade fiction and who want a good read as well. It is aimed at ages eight and over, but teenage and adult readers will still fund messages in this book that they can take on board.

The story is engaging and has a good pace – not too fast, and not too slow, allowing the plot and characters to evolve and develop as it heads towards its conclusion. I thought this book was well-written as well. It draws the reader into the story, and as you head along the journey with Anders, Rayna and their friends, you feel the tension, worry and fear, as well as the hope and all the emotions in between. There is a sense that things might not work out, and hints at what has come before that has led to where the characters are now.

Overall, it is a great conclusion to the trilogy, and one that I hope many readers will enjoy.

The Power of Positive Pranking by Nat Amoore

positive prankingTitle: The Power of Positive Pranking

Author: Nat Amoore

Genre: Fiction

Publisher: Puffin

Published: 2nd June 2020

Format: Paperback

Pages: 368

Price: $14.99

Synopsis: Green Peas is our name and pranking’s our game!

A symphony of alarm clocks at assembly? Yep, that was us. A stampede of fluffy guinea pigs? That’s next on our agenda.

But for me, Cookie and Zeke, it’s about more than just fun. We’re determined to make a difference. And when the adults won’t listen, us kids will find a way to be heard – as long as we can stay out of detention!
No activist is too small, no prank too big… and things are about to get personal.

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~*~

Casey, Cookie and Zeke are Watterson Primary School’s best prankers. And so far, they haven’t been caught. Yet they only use their pranks for good – to help people and alert everyone to important issues that the adults in their lives don’t seem to be worried about. It’s all about making sure everyone knows what’s really going on in the world and sometimes, a good prank is what works.

When Casey and her friends find out what Mayor Lupholl has planned for their town at a school assembly, they are catapulted into action to save the park, a beloved tree and the Lego house built in Nat’s previous book, Secrets of a Schoolyard Millionaire. Yep, Nat has cleverly tied the events and characters, and location of her first book into this one, and both are filled with the same humour and wonderful diversity. Whether it is disability, race, interests, ethics or family make up – Nat has managed to show a diverse world, and one that everyone can relate to in some way. In each book she has had a character or two with an invisible disability – and this is exciting for people who never see themselves represented. In acknowledging invisible disabilities and that disabled people are not to be pitied, Nat has opened the door for more of this representation to follow.

AWW2020

Similarly, with her relationships and the characters races – they just are who they are and this is beautiful to see in a novel for kids so they can see just how diverse the world is.

And we finally learn what positive pranking is and how it works – it mustn’t hurt anyone, but it must send a message – and when Casey needs to pull off the biggest positive prank ever, she has to find a way to get the entire school and her family onside so they can make sure that they don’t lose their beloved town to corrupt forces.

Nat takes issues that might seem complex – politics, the environment, activism – and makes them easy to understand, accessible and of course, fun and humorous. These are issues that affect everyone, as does good representation and it is something that we should all be caring about – which is the message of Nat’s book – to take action where you can and diversity is a good thing! I loved Tess and Toby coming back in – it really tied the two books together nicely, and this is a great way to do so. It’s not really a series based around a concept, plot or characters, as each book can be read on its own, or together. But it could work as a potential series set in the same town and primary school, where you can read any or all of the books – it just makes it more fun to read them together to appreciate all the little nods and hints.

I loved this book, and its predecessor. It took a serious topic, made it fun as well as serious at the same time, and was a nice, engaging read – which also made it a quick read for me. Sometimes there are engaging books like this that can be gobbled up and enjoyed, and then revisited. This is one of those books, and it is one that I think lots of kids will enjoy, and hopefully, relate to and learn something from.

You can read my accompanying interview with Nat here – we agreed to publish the interview and review side by side for publication day.

Isolation Publicity with Nat Amoore – author and co-host of the most wonderful One More Page.

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Due to recent events, many Australian authors have had to cancel book launches and festival appearances. For some, this means new novels, series continuations and debut novels are heading into this scary, strange world without much publicity or attention. The good news is, you can still buy books – online or get your local bookstore to deliver if they’re offering that service. Buying these books, talking about them, sharing them, reading them, reviewing them – are all ways that for the next six months at least, we can ensure that these books don’t fall by the wayside.

Over the next few months, a lot of us will be consuming some form of art – entertainment, movies, TV, radio, music, books – the list goes on. It is something we will be turning to take our minds off things and to occupy vast swathes of free time. One of the things I will be doing to support the arts, and specifically, Australian Authors, will be reading and reviewing as many books as possible, conducting interviews like this where possible, and participating in virtual book tours for authors.

Nat is a kid’s author. She has written Secrets of a Schoolyard Millionaire, and her latest book, out today, is The Power of Positive Pranking. Nat also runs one of my favourite podcasts, One More Page with Liz Ledden and Kate Simpson, which focuses on Aussie kids books and is a fantastic place to go when looking for your next read or your kid’s next read. Like many authors, Nat had all kinds of awesome events planned around the release of her new book, and visits to bookstores – including my favourite. It would have been really cool to meet Nat – we’ll save that for when we can both get to the best bookstore ever! This is one of my most enthusiastic and fun interviews – they all have been but something about Nat’s books made this loads of fun and hopefully it is filled with laughter for my readers. This was one I wanted to share early, but we both agreed to tee it up with the book release! So enjoy!

Hi Nat and welcome to The Book Muse!

  1. I recently read and reviewed Secrets of a Schoolyard Millionaire – to begin, where did that idea come from, and how did Tess form in your mind?

The idea originally came from a tiny little newspaper article about a 10-year-old girl in the US who got busted with twenty grand in her school locker. There was no explanation as to how it got there and I just couldn’t stop thinking about it. As far as Tess goes, I think anyone who knows me will tell you that there is quite a bit of me in Tess. I was always scheming and scamming when I was a kid and always had (and still do have) a new project on the boil every day.

  1. Your second book, The Power of Positive Pranking has just come out – what exactly is positive pranking?

 

Positive Pranking brings together a few ideas. Firstly, the grey area between right and wrong. I love playing with this as a concept. The idea of doing the wrong thing for the right reasons. So using the power of being an awesome prankster for positive reasons/effects. Also, it plays with the idea that there is a ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ way to bring about change. When kids were missing school to participate in climate change rallies, there were a lot of adults saying ‘they should be in school’ or ‘this is not the way to bring about change’ but I think it’s very arrogant to suggest that there is a ‘right’ way to change the world. Effecting change is difficult and it’s hard to know how it should be done. But we have to try.

  1. Have you ever played any positive pranks on anyone, and what were they?

Oh dear, plenty! Some of the pranks in this book are based on VERY personal experiences but to protect the innocent (and more importantly, the guilty) I cannot admit which ones.

  1. Prior to these novels, have you had anything else published?

No. Secrets of a Schoolyard Millionaire was my first publication. Well, that’s not quite true, I had a poem published in a poetry anthology when I was in high school, but other than that…no. The Power of Positive Pranking will be book number two and I have signed two more contracts with Penguin Random House for upcoming books.

  1. Are there any noteworthy awards under your belt?

I had a pretty amazing year at the CYA conference in 2018 where I placed 1st & 2nd in the Picture Book category and 2nd in the Chapter Book for Younger Readers. That same year I was also a recipient of the Maurice Saxby Creative Development Program. It’s also the year I signed my first book contract. 2018 was a big year for me! I also just found out the Secrets Of A Schoolyard Millionaire was Australia’s #1 best-selling debut Aussie Children’s Fiction in 2019 and it’s been sold into three other territories. So that’s pretty awesome!

  1. I absolutely love your podcast with Kate and Liz, One More Page. Where did the idea for the podcast come from, and how do you go about choosing your books for each episode?

Kate, Liz and I wanted to share our love of kids’ books and provide a platform for Australian kidlit authors to really shine. It was before any of us were published but we were deeply involved in the kidlit community and just wanted a way to share the love. We were fans of podcasts and so thought it would be a great medium. At that stage, no one else was really doing a podcast that was specifically about Australian kids’ books (that we knew of) and so we thought it would work well. We get sent many, many, MANY books and review requests from publishers and authors and we choose them like we might in a book shop…whatever grabs us. We read heaps of books and then review the ones we really love.

  1. If you had a million dollars like Tess and Toby, what would you do with it?

I honestly think I would probably do ‘a Tess’. Splurge in the beginning – throw parties, hire jumping castles, eat way too many lollies – and then settle down and work out what good I could do with the money.

  1. Serious question now: Most authors have had launches, and various literary events or conferences cancelled due to the pandemic – what have you had to cancel or reschedule, and which were you most looking forward to?

Aw it hurts a bit to answer this. I had a really incredible couple of months lined up, and it’s all been cancelled unfortunately. I had an awesome book launch planned. I’d hired a whole hall and was going to deck it out in blue and yellow with custom printed fart cushions for all the kids and a ‘safe snack table’ and a ‘prank snack table’ for those who were game. I was then meant to head off on a national book tour including Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide, including TV appearances, school visits, book signings and a whole lot of crazy Nat-shenanigans. But a really big one that hurt, was I had been invited to host the Primary School Days Program at the Sydney Writer’s Festival. If you’ve never been to one before it’s like a massive book rock concert in front of HUNDREDS of kids. They completely FILL Town Hall and other venues. It was already sold out. I was SO looking forward to getting crazy with all those kids, spreading the absolute joy of reading and meeting kidlit superstars like Raina Telgemeier (I would have been a TOTAL fan girl). I was also lined up to host one of the Family Program days. Amelia Lush had put together SUCH an amazing program for the 2020 festival and I am so gutted it’s been cancelled. We just have to rally together when this is all over and whole-heartedly support festivals like this when they make a come-back because the writing world would be a MUCH sadder place without them.

  1. I remember you told me you had an event booked at my local indie, BookFace Erina – is this the kind of event you think will be rescheduled, and have you ever been to BookFace?

I haven’t YET. But I am VERY much looking forward to a visit and I’m sure it will happen as soon as the world returns to normal-ish. I think I was a Central-Coastian in a past life. I just love it up there. My mentor and close friend Cathie Tasker lives up there and so I go up to visit quite often. Even if the event isn’t rescheduled, next time I’m allowed to visit Cathie, I’m DEFINITELY dropping in to BookFace…so keep your eye out!

  1. What made you decide to do your book-inspired dance videos during isolation?

 

Honestly? I looked at all the amazing things authors were doing and I really wanted to contribute but I was also going a bit bananas in isolation. Being stuck inside is pretty hard on me and with school visits cancelled, I don’t have the same avenues to burn my energy…and there’s a LOT of it! I used to be a dance fitness instructor and so I just decided to combine my two loves – books and dance – and create Book’N’Boogie! It’s as much for me as anyone who’s watching! I really need to shake it out every couple of days. But I’ve been getting sent heaps of videos of kids dancing along with me and it just makes my heart burst!

  1. Your Gif game on Twitter is really cool – what is it about this medium that you enjoy, and do you enjoy Gif wars?

The discovery of GIFs changed my life. I’m such a visual and expression-using person (is that even a word?) and I love how GIFs capture an entire feeling in just a moment. And when you get JUST the right one, it’s like nailing a joke – it just feels so perfect! I taught my dad how to GIF and now we barely use words when we text – just GIF after GIF after GIF. I also wrote a complete story with illustrator James Foley on Twitter DM once using only GIFs, and I still go back and look at it when I need a giggle.

  1. If you could meet any kid’s author, who would it be, and why?

Paul Jennings. Although technically I did meet him when I was about 10 AND I got to interview him in 2017 for the podcast (although it was online not face to face). But I still think it would be him again. Or maybe Jon Klassen. I feel like I would enjoy his sense of humour.

  1. What kids’ books should everyone read, regardless of their age?

Oh there are SO many. Sentimentally, I would say Uncanny by Paul Jennings and Skymaze by Gillian Rubenstein because I think both those books played a huge role in my desire to become a writer. But I believe heavily in supporting current authors, so I think you MUST read A Cardboard Palace by Allayne Webster and Vincent and the Grandest Hotel On Earth by Lisa Nicol. They are both brilliant and shouldn’t be missed.

  1. Which Hogwarts house do you think you belong in, and who would your Hogwarts crew have been?

Okay, so I wasn’t actually sure of the answer for this one so I just did an online quiz and it told me Gryffindor. That sounds about right to me. I reckon my crew would include Ron, Hagrid, Luna, Dobby (personal fav!), Sirius and probably Nymphadora Tonks. And then any of those other cool magic creatures that wanna hang with us – a hippogriff pet would totally rock!

  1. If you weren’t a kid’s author, what would your dream job be and why?

I would love to be either a Kid’s TV Show host, preferably a show where there was a lot of slime involved OR a homicide investigator. I know they don’t seem to go hand in hand but two of my biggest loves are slime and true crime – AND THEY RHYME!

  1. What are your go-to movies or television shows when not reading and writing?

I ALWAYS go back to the 80s. The Goonies, The Princess Bride, The Never Ending Story, The Labyrinth, The Dark Crystal, The Blues Brothers, Stand By Me, Willow, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Beetlejuice…I can be lost for hours in the 80s. I’ll watch these movies over and over and NEVER get sick of them.

 

  1. Favourite music, band or song, and why?

Favourite bands are The Lucksmiths (not together anymore but still a fav) because of their awesome lyrics, super dance-y tunes and because they were the soundtrack to my high school years and some of the best times of my life were to tune of The Lucksmiths. Also Cat Empire because I cannot not dance when I hear them. All-time favourite song is hard but might be ‘What I Like About You’ by The Romantics because, well just listen to it and tell me it’s not THE BEST!

  1. Cats or dogs?

Dogs. But actually monkeys, if that was an option.

  1. Favourite writing snack, and what happens when you run out of it?

Coffee. I don’t really snack while I write but I devour coffee! I don’t run out of it. Ever! It’s not an option. I wouldn’t operate. I’m getting anxious just thinking about it. I better have a coffee.

  1. What’s next in terms of books?

Well, obviously trying to get The Power Of Positive Pranking out into the world. It’s going to take some creative approaches because I usually love the face to face contact with kids and booksellers to get my books out there in the world. In Corona-time, I’m gonna to have to get creative. I’ll miss meeting people, but hopefully it won’t be too long till I’m back out there in schools and shops and libraries, causing trouble. Then I have two more books currently set for 2021. One which is already written and is a stand-alone, not related to my previous books. And one which is not written (eeeekkkk!) and is planned to be the third in the ‘Watterson World’ – so connected to my first two books. Then I will have fulfilled all current contracts and I can really have a good think about what it is next. The world is my sea slug! That’s the saying right?

Any further comments?

You rock! And thanks so much for supporting kids’ authors in these tough times. We sooooooooo appreciate you!

 

Thanks Nat!