Book Review and Giveaway: The Gum Nut Babies by May Gibbs

GB-CE.pngTitle: Gumnut Babies Centenary Edition

Author: May Gibbs

Genre: Children’s Literature

Publisher: HarperCollins Australia

Published: 1916, Centenary Edition 2016

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 272

Price: $39.99

Synopsis: Beautiful new Centenary edition to celebrate the publication of May Gibbs’s first book, Gumnut Babies, in 1916. May Gibbs’s marvellous creation – the Gumnut world, with its tiny heroes and heroines and deliciously villainous villains – has fascinated generations of children since its first publication in 1916. Gumnuts at the races, at the ballet, and dancing at balls are some of May’s exquisitely illustrated scenes that have delighted us all. This beautiful new edition has been produced to mark the centenary of Gumnut Babies and contains the stories of Gum-nut BabiesGum-Blossom BabiesFlannel Flowers and Other Bush BabiesBoronia BabiesWattle Babies, plus Nuttybub and Nittersing and Chucklebud and Wunkydoo. This is the perfect companion for The Complete Adventures of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie.

~*~

The Gum Nut Babies by May Gibbs are a staple of an Australian child’s literary diet, and they have been for over one hundred years. In this exquisite edition, each poem is reproduced with accompanying original artwork for each type of Gum Nut and Blossom baby, and the stories of Nuttybub and Nittersing, and Chucklebud and Wunkydoo are reproduced, as May Gibbs wrote them, for a new generation. In these stories, Nittersing and Nuttybub go on adventures around the bush, searching for each other, and enlisting the help of fellow animals against the Big Bad Banksia men, who try to destroy the peace of all the other animals and bush babies, whose fear of the Big Bad Banksia men is perhaps more than their fear of Humans, a threat that is heard about but not seen. Instead, they must find away to beat the Big Bad Banksia men, as must Chucklebud and Wunkydoo in their various adventures.

aww2017-badgeEach pair inevitably becomes separated and they battle the perils of the bush to find each other again in two charming stories, told by one of Australia’s most adored authors. At the back, there is a small biography of May Gibbs, a contemporary of Beatrix Potter of the Lakes District, and author of the Peter Rabbit tales. As I have mentioned in the other reviews for these books, so there will be some overlap, May Gibbs is Australia’s Beatrix Potter, both interested in conservation and their natural surrounds at a time of great change and upheaval in their countries, as the city of Sydney, in particular the area of Neutral Bay, grew up around Nutcote, where May Gibbs lived – her answer to Hilltop.

These books are delightful to read at any age, and I hope will continue to charm and capture the imaginations of children for many generations to come. They are the sorts of books that deserve to stay in print. Published during the last years of World War One, at a time when Gum Nut babies were also used as propaganda to show support for the war, and encourage patriotism in a time when it was waning. However, the Gum Nut Babies of these stories do not go to war, but off on grand adventures that children dream of heading off on.

As a child, these would have been amongst the first Australian stories I was exposed to, and have always been something I have loved. May Gibbs has taken the natural environment she knew and loved, and created a magical world that children and adults can escape to, and spend some time away from the trappings of modern life, and learn about various types of native wildlife and plant life in a fun and exciting way.

This post is part of the May Gibbs centenary celebrations, and the May Gibbs brand is running a giveaway for the next two weeks via my blog to win a copy of this book. Enter below and good luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Buy the book here:

https://www.maygibbs.org/

Australian Reads: May Gibbs and The Gumnut Babies.

The first in what I hope will be a series and ongoing theme about Australian books and literature sincesnugglepot.png colonial times, as well as recent literature, and the bush poets that have shaped what it means to be Australian, this post on May Gibbs and the Gumnut Babies is my introduction to this project. I will still be reviewing books sent to me and by non-Australian authors, but I would like to promote Australian literature and the book industry here as well.

The literature of a nation can shape a country – whether it is oral or written, or oral and later recorded. Australian literature was shaped first through bush stories and bush poets, and some of the most popular authors and their writings have remained in print for decades. As a child, having access to a variety of literature from Australia and around the world – shaped my love of reading and has shaped a passion for Australian stories – wherever they come from and whoever may write them. To begin my series about this area of literature, here are some of my thoughts on May Gibbs.

Australian children have grown up for generations with iconic picture books and stories that have shaped their early years and cemented an Australian identity through the books that are read to them as young toddlers and that they then learn to read themselves. From there, they will explore Australian novels and poetry that have shaped and continue to shape our nation as more unique Australian voices are heard. However, one of the first books that young Australians will be introduced to and that, for nearly a century, has enchanted children and people of all ages, are the stories of the gumnut babies – Snugglepot and Cuddlepie, and their escape from The Big Bad Banksia Men.

aww2017-badgeMay Gibbs began her paintings of the gumnut baby characters in 1916, beginning with the first story, Gumnut Babies as well as illustrating cards to send to soldiers during the First World War. In 1918, Snugglepot and Cuddlepie was published, and will celebrate its 100th Birthday next year. It has never been out of print since, and can be found at the Nutcote gift shop, where May Gibbs lived and wrote, as well as other booksellers across Australia.

Snugglepot and Cuddlepie and the gumnut babies are Australia’s answer to the fairy tales of Europe that children are read. They allow Australian children to explore the Australian environment through a unique fairy tale that does not involve castles and ogres, but babies born from gumnuts and evil banksia men that threaten them when they get lost. A review and giveaway with the May Gibbs Foundation will be forthcoming in the next few months, so watch this space.