Ride Free by Jessica Whitman

 

 

ride free.jpgTitle: Ride Free

Author: Jessica Whitman

Genre: Popular Fiction

Publisher: Arena/Allen and Unwin

Published: 23rd November, 2016

Format: Paperback

Pages: 320

Price: $29.99

Synopsis: When legendary polo player Carlos Del Campo’s will is read to his grieving family they’re shocked to discover he has a daughter, Antonia, he never told them about. Not long after this revelation, Carlos’s eldest son, Alejandro, sets out to find his long-lost sister.

 

Having always dreamt of one day being reunited with her father, Antonia – aka Noni – is heartbroken when the half-brother she’s never met arrives on her doorstep with news of Carlos’s death. Despite her anguish she decides to accept Alejandro’s offer of a job in the family polo business, though she worries about her outsider status.

 

When Enzo Rivas, the Del Campos’ loyal stable master, sees what a brilliant rider Noni is he’s convinced she could transform the family polo team’s lagging fortunes. Complicating things is that he and Noni are rapidly falling in love with each other. Then a secret from Noni’s past threatens both her new life and her budding romance with Enzo …

 

Full of secrets, scandal and passion, Ride Free is about overcoming fear to find happiness in life – and love.

 

 

~*~

 

As someone who is not a big reader of the romance genre, unless the romance and the other aspects of the story are given equal footing, this book wasn’t to my personal tastes. The concept of a secret daughter, one that has been hidden from the family was intriguing, though. Jessica Whitman’s Antonia (Noni) is close to turning thirty after finding out eight years previously about her father’s death and being taken back to the Del Campo family. She hasn’t had an easy life though, and is struggling to find her place. Yet again, polo makes an appearance, and I found that even though it is an important part of the Del Campo family, it perhaps needed a little more background for readers that might not be familiar with it.

 

I found myself wishing that the romance between Noni and Enzo had been given a little more meat, and when it turned into a love triangle between her ex, her and Enzo, I had hoped for a little more than the ex just appearing with her mother and Noni falling into a tizzy over which man to go with. Refreshingly though, she wasn’t the only one flailing in the throes of a romance. Seeing Enzo do so was interesting, and gave him an extra dimension that would have been interesting to explore further.

The one downfall I have had with this, and Wild One has been that the most interesting storylines – the film making and the secret daughter plots, played second fiddle to the others. I felt these would have made the stories meatier, and given the characters more depth, as they all felt either too perfect, or in the case of Noni’s ex, too imperfect. Even though I didn’t enjoy either of these books, and admittedly read them rather quickly to get onto the next review book in my piles, I still think they have their place and their audience. This audience is not me but more likely people who want a relatively quick read that doesn’t need much interrogation of plots and characters, or romance lovers. It is definitely written to these audiences and those searching for escapism.

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