Harry Potter: A History of Magic

A history of magicTitle: Harry Potter: A History of Magic

Author: British Library

Genre: Exhibition Catalogue/Fiction

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Published: 6th November 2017

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 256

Price: $49.99

Synopsis: Harry Potter: A History of Magic is the official book of the exhibition, a once-in-a-lifetime collaboration between Bloomsbury, J.K. Rowling and the brilliant curators of the British Library. It promises to take readers on a fascinating journey through the subjects studied at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry – from Alchemy and Potions classes through to Herbology and Care of Magical Creatures.

Each chapter showcases a treasure trove of artefacts from the British Library and other collections around the world, beside exclusive manuscripts, sketches and illustrations from the Harry Potter archive. There’s also a specially commissioned essay for each subject area by an expert, writer or cultural commentator, inspired by the contents of the exhibition – absorbing, insightful and unexpected contributions from Steve Backshall, the Reverend Richard Coles, Owen Davies, Julia Eccleshare, Roger Highfield, Steve Kloves, Lucy Mangan, Anna Pavord and Tim Peake, who offer a personal perspective on their magical theme.

Readers will be able to pore over ancient spell books, amazing illuminated scrolls that reveal the secret of the Elixir of Life, vials of dragon’s blood, mandrake roots, painted centaurs and a genuine witch’s broomstick, in a book that shows J.K. Rowling’s magical inventions alongside their cultural and historical forebears.

This is the ultimate gift for Harry Potter fans, curious minds, big imaginations, bibliophiles and readers around the world who missed out on the chance to see the exhibition in person.

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For twenty years, the Wizarding World of Harry Potter and Hogwarts have charmed the world, adults and children alike. From the very first lines about the perfectly normal Dursleys in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone to the final words of Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows as a new generation begins Hogwarts, millions of people have been captivated by Harry and his friends. To celebrate the twentieth anniversary, new House editions, and various related books have been published. To coincide with this anniversary, The British Library has curated an exhibit of Harry Potter memorabilia, and related historical and literary items that have been associated with magic across the world throughout history, and influenced the subjects and the world of Harry Potter. Harry Potter: A History of Magic is a journey not just through Harry’s world but an entire historical and literary world of magic and beliefs in magic.

hp20_230From Potions to Magical Creatures, Herbology and Charms, this book has it all. The world of magic is varied, diverse and complex, and the history behind it is fascinating. Covering the power of words – Charms and the origins and ideas behind some of the magical creatures in Fantastic Beast’s and Where To Find Them, such as dragons and their eggs, the phoenix and unicorns, and their real life counterparts and imaginings as shown in ancient and medieval texts, which are part of the curated exhibit, from various museum collections, and give insight into a pre-science understanding of the world that is fascinating and intriguing.

The exhibition catalogue is separated into several chapters: The Journey, Potions and Alchemy, Herbology, Charms, Astronomy, Divination, Defence Against the Dark Arts, Care of Magical Creatures, and Past, Present and Future. Transfiguration is spoken about in Charms, and each chapter begins with an essay relating to the topic, where the Harry Potter subject is outlined, and a brief history given before historical, literary and Harry Potter specific images of artefacts are presented with notes, such as images of drafts of chapters in some books, and information about Fantastic Beasts and The Cursed Child.

Being able to read this book meant I was able to experience the exhibit from the page. Whilst I would love to go over to London and see this in person at the British Museum, the magic is not lost experiencing it on the page. You still get to see the images of the artefacts, and read the essays and notes, and see Jim Kay’s illustrations. It allowed me to immerse myself in the world beyond the books, and imagine being at the British Library, looking at the hand-written pages by JK Rowling that hold the first hints of the magic to come that charmed the world and that continues to do so.

Booktopia

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