Australian Children’s Laureate 2018-2019: Morris Gleitzman

In 2008, The Australia Children’s Literature Alliance was formed as an independent and not-for-profit organisation that champions and promotes “the transformational power of reading in the lives of young Australians.” The ACLA is inclusive, representing the spectrum of the field of children’s and young adult literature. The vision and mission of the ACLA is:

ACLA’s vision is to: enrich the lives of young Australians through the power of story. 

ACLA’s mission is to:

  • Promote the value, importance and transformational nature of reading

  • Influence the reading habits of Australian families

  • Raise the profile of books in the lives of children and young adults

  • Champion the cause of young Australians reading.

The organisation’s primary activity is developing and managing the Australian Children’s Laureate Program, established based on the successful implementation of similar programs in the UK, the US, with programs in Finland, Holland, Ireland, Mexico, Sweden and Wales as well.

The Children’s Laureate is an Australian author or illustrator of books for children and/or young adults, and in particular, someone who has made a significant contribution to the canon of Australian Children’s Literature and is appointed on a biennial basis. The inaugural year, 2012-2013 – was shared by two well-loved authors, Alison Lester and Boori Monty Pryor.

In 2014-2015, Jackie French took the mantle. She has authored over 140 books, including The Matilda Saga and the iconic Diary of a Wombat.

 

Leigh Hobbs held the mantle for 2016-2017.

And the Australian Children’s Laureate for 2018-1019 is Morris Gleitzman. The theme for his term is Stories Make Us – Stories Create Our Future. Morris has written celebrated books for the youth market for over thirty years including Two Weeks With the Queen, and the Felix Series, stating with Once.

In a world where our attention is divided by many different means of technology, it is comforting to know that there are those passionate about championing books for children, and showing the power of books to teach, to heal, to help us understand the world around us. Keep an eye on the included links for more information on what Morris gets up to this year.

More information about the role and how it is selected can be found here:

Further links and interviews:

http://readingtime.com.au/cbca-book-year-younger-reader-acceptance-speech-morris-gleitzman-author-soon/

http://www.morrisgleitzman.com

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-12/morris-gleitzman-on-why-kids-need-books-author/9421494

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/australias-new-childrens-laureate-morris-gleitzman-hopes-to-inspire-children-in-dark-uncertain-world-20180207-h0vr05.html

Booktopia

Advertisements

2018 NSW PREMIER’S LITERARY AWARDS

The NSW Government has a long tradition of celebrating and connecting the public with art and literature. The NSW Premier’s Literary Awards are an opportunity to highlight the importance of literacy and literature, whilst enjoying and learning from the work of our writers in NSW and Australia. Like other literary awards, this award in highlighting the spectacular Australian Literature Australian writers produce, highlights and honours the achievements of Australia’s writers, and their artistic contributions to society, but also to highlight our literary achievements to the world. The State Library administers the awards.AWW-2018-badge-rose

The NSW Premier’s Literary Awards have more categories than the Victorian awards. These categories are:

Christina Stead Prize for Fiction

2017 Winner: The Museum of Modern Love by Heather Rose

2017 Shortlist: Vancouver #3 in the series Wisdom Tree by Nick Earls

Their Brilliant Careers: The Fantastic Lives of Sixteen Extraordinary Australian Writers by Ryan O’Neill

Where the Light Falls by Gretchen Shirm

After the Carnage by Tara June Winch

The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood.

UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing

2017 Winner: Letter to Pessoa by Michelle Cahil

2017 Shortlist:

The Memory Artist by Katherine Brabon

Dodge Rose by Jack Cox

Our Magic Hour by Jennifer Down

Portable Curiosities by Julie Koh

The Bonobo’s Dream by Rose Mulready

Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-Fiction

2017 Winner: Our Man Elsewhere: In Search of Alan Moorehead by Thornton McCamish

2017 Shortlist: Everywhere I Look by Helen Garner

Talking to My Country by Stan Grant

The Art of Time Travel: Historians and Their Craft by Tom Griffiths

Avalanche by Julia Leigh

Prince of Darkness: The Untold Story of Jeremiah G. Hamilton, Wall Street’s First Black Millionaire by Shane White

Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry

2017 Winner: Ghostspeaking by Peter Boyle

2017 Shortlist: Burnt Umber by Paul Hetherington

Breaking the Days by Jill Jones

Fragments by Antigone Kefala

Firebreaks: Poems by John Kinsella

Comfort Food by Ellen van Neerven

Ethel Turner Prize for Young People’s Literature

2017 Winner: One Thousand Hills by James Roy and Noël Zihabamwe

2017 Shortlist: Elegy by Jane Abbott

The Ghost by the Billabong by Jackie French 

the-ghost-by-the-billabong

The Sidekicks by Will Kostakis

The Boundless Sublime by Lili Wilkinson

One Would Think the Deep by Claire Zorn

Patricia Wrightson Prize for Children’s Literature

2017 Winner: Iris and the Tiger by Leanne Hall

2017 Shortlist: Magrit by Lee Battersby and Amy Daoud

Something Wonderful by Raewyn Caisley and Karen Blair

Desert Lake Pamela Freeman and Liz Anelli

Figgy and the President by Tamsin Janu

Welcome to Country by Aunty Joy Murphy and Lisa Kennedy

Nick Enright Prize For Playwriting

 

2017 Winner: The Drover’s Wife by Leah Purcell

2017 Shortlist:  The Hanging by Angela Betzein

You, Me and the Space Between by Finegan Kruckemeyer

Ladies Day by Alana Valentine

Betty Roland Prize for Scriptwriting

2017 Winner: The Code – Series 2, Episode 4 by Shelley Birse

2017 Shortlist: Down Under by Abe Forsythe

Sucker by Lawrence Leung and Ben Chessel

The Kettering Incident episode 1 by Victoria Madden

Afghanistan: Inside Australia’s War by Victoria Midwinter Pitt

Cleverman Episode 5 “Terra Nullius” by Michael Miller

Multicultural NSW Award

 2017 Winner: The Hate Race by Maxine Beneba Clarke

2017 Shortlist: Offshore: Behind the Wire on Manus and Nauru by Madeline Gleeson

Not Quite Australian: How Temporary Migration is Changing the Nation by Peter Mares

Of Ashes and Rivers that Run to the Sea by Marie Munkara

Promising Azra Helen Thurloe – on my To Be Read pile.

The Fighter: A True Story by Arnold Zable

NSW Premier’s Translation Prize

 2017 Winner: Royall Tyler

2017 Shortlist: J.M.Q Davies

Penny Hueston

Jennifer Lindsay

Multicultural NSW Early Career Translation Prize

 2017 Winner: Jan Owen

2017 Shortlist: Christopher Williams

Indigenous Writer’s Prize – Biennial Prize Next Awarded in 2018

Last awarded in 2016.

2016 Winners: Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe and Heat and Light by Ellen van Neerven

2016 Shortlist: Ghost River by Tony Birch

Inside My Mother by Ali Cobby Eckermann

Dirty Words by Natalie Harkin

Not Just Black and White by Lesley Williams and Tammy Williams

Other Awards:

NSW Prize for Literature

2017 Winner: The Drover’s Wife by Leah Purcell

People’s Choice Award

 2017 Winner: Vancouver #3 in the series Wisdom Tree by Nick Earls

 Special Award

 The Special Award was last awarded to Rosie Scott AM in 2016.

Across these twelve categories and the three additional ones, there is a diverse range of authors and stories, that tell of personal experiences, imagined worlds and that draw on history and the world the authors have lived that led them to write these books. Each prize I have looked at so far has shown a different degree of diversity, with this one having a broader range, if only because it has more categories than the others I have looked at. Last year’s winners and nominees are in good company with past winners Peter Carey, David Malouf AO, Elizabeth Jolley, Thomas Keneally AO and Helen Garner.

Each prize has a different amount of money, and further details can be found in the provided links. In 2018, the total prize money, including sponsored awards is up to $305 000, and to be nominated for any of these awards, the writer and illustrator must be living Australian citizens or hold permanent resident status.

Taken from the website:

The NSW Premier’s Literary Awards are presented by the NSW Government and administered by the State Library in association with Create NSW. We are pleased to acknowledge the support of Multicultural NSW and the University of Technology Sydney (UTS).

The 2018 winners will be announced on 30 April 2018.The short-list will be announced in March.

Purchase any of the above books here:

Booktopia

Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards 2018 Winners

2018 VPLA Victorian Premier's Literary Awards key art tile.jpg

Each year, the State Premiers of Australia nominate several books across several categories for literary awards, and each of the awards are announced at different times, and have different categories.  The Victorian awards were inaugurated in 1985 to honour Australian writing and are administered by the Wheeler Centre on behalf of the Premier of Victoria.

The Victorian awards are split into five categories: fiction, non-fiction, drama, poetry and writing for young adults, with one winner in each. Each winner wins $25,000 and they go on to contest the Victorian Prize for Literature. The Premier’s Award also incorporates the Unpublished Manuscript Award, won by Christian White for Decay Theory in 2017, and a biennial Award for Indigenous Writing. Both of these awards go onto contest the Victorian Literary Prize with the other five categories.

People can participate in the awards by voting for their favourite work on the shortlist, and the winner of the People’s Choice Award, which is named alongside the general categories wins $2,000.

In 2018, none of the winners were male or identified as male. Of the five winners, four were women, and one was non-binary – Alison Evans, whose novel, Ida, won The People’s Choice Award. This year’s winners were announced on the first of February.

The winners

  • The Victorian Prize for Literature, and the Prize for Non-FictionThe Trauma Cleaner: One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in Death, Decay & Disaster by Sarah Krasnostein (Text Publishing)
  • The Prize for Fiction: Australia Day by Melanie Cheng (Text Publishing)
  • The Prize for DramaRiceby Michele Lee (Playlab)
  • The Prize for PoetryArgosy by Bella Li (Vagabond Press)
  • The Prize for Writing for Young AdultsLiving on Hope Street by Demet Divaroren (Allen & Unwin)
  • People’s Choice AwardIda by Alison Evans (Echo)

Of these, I have Australia Day by Melanie Cheng on my To Be Read list, and am deciding which of the others to explore.

The above winners were chosen and voted for from the following shortlist:

The shortlist

Fiction 

  • A New England Affair by Steven Carroll (HarperCollins)
  • Australia Day by Melanie Cheng (Text Publishing)
  • The Life to Come by Michelle de Kretser (Allen & Unwin)
  • The Choke by Sofie Laguna (Allen & Unwin)
  • The Restorer by Michael Sala (Text Publishing)
  • Taboo by Kim Scott (Picador Australia)

Non-fiction

  • The Museum of Words: A Memoir of Language, Writing and Mortality by Georgia Blain (Scribe Publications)
  • Anaesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness by Kate Cole-Adams (Text Publishing)
  • The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in Death, Decay & Disaster by Sarah Krasnostein (Text Publishing)
  • For a Girl: A True Story of Secrets, Motherhood and Hope by Mary-Rose MacColl (Allen & Unwin)
  • No Way But This: In Search of Paul Robeson by Jeff Sparrow (Scribe Publications)
  • Tracker by Alexis Wright (Giramondo)

Drama

  • Rice by Michele Lee (Playlab)
  • Black is the New White by Nakkiah Lui (Sydney Theatre Company)
  • The Rasputin Affair by Kate Mulvany (The Ensemble Theatre)

Poetry

  • Argosy by Bella Li (Vagabond Press)
  • The Metronome by Jennifer Maiden (Giramondo)
  • redactor by Eddie Paterson (Whitmore Press)

Writing for Young Adults

  • Living on Hope Street by Demet Divaroren (Allen & Unwin)
  • Ida by Alison Evans (Echo)
  • Because of You by Pip Harry (UQP)

Highly commended

Fiction

  • No More Boats by Felicity Castagna (Giramondo)
  • Terra Nullius by Claire Coleman (Hachette)
  • Atlantic Black by A.S. Patrić (Transit Lounge)
  • Plane Tree Drive by Lynette Washington (MidnightSun)

Non-fiction 

  • They Cannot Take the Sky: Stories from Detention edited by Michael Green, André Dao, Angelica Neville, Dana Affleck and Sienna Merope (Allen & Unwin)

Poetry

  • I Love Poetry by Michael Farrell (Giramondo)
  • Reading for a Quiet Morning by Petra White (GloriaSMH Press)

Young Adult

  • In the Dark Spaces by Cally Black (Hardie Grant Egmont)

Reading up on as many of these entries as possible shows that this award strived for diversity too, and in naming four women and one non-binary author as winners, shows the importance of having these voices heard in society, but also the exemplary work these authors have achieved to have been nominated for these awards. Some of the authors on the shortlist were also nominated for the Stella Prize, and are on the 2018 Longlist, and information about this can be found on my post about the 2018 Stella Prize here.

Booktopia

Announcement: New Hannah Richell Novel coming in Mid-2018

images

Fiona Hazard, the Publishing Director of Hachette Australia, has announced the Australia-New Zealand acquisition rights to a new novel by Hannah Richell, The Peacock Summer, in a joint deal with Orion, UK. It is the first novel to be released by Hannah since the publication of her first two novels, Secrets of the Tides (2012), one of the highest selling books on the Nielsen Book Scan that year, and picked for the Richard and Judy Book Club, and the Waterstones Book Club in the UK. Secrets of the Tides was shortlisted in Australia for the Australian Independent Bookseller Award (ABIA) for best Debut Fiction and ABIA General Fiction Book of the Year in 2013, the same year her second novel, The Shadow Year was published to similar acclaim.

Taking a break after the death of her husband, Matt, for whose honour and memory the Richell Award is named, she has slowly come back to The Peacock Summer, to simultaneously released in Australia, New Zealand and the UK in July 2018, with translation rights sold in Germany, France and Sweden, with more to follow.

Here is another book to look out for to complete the Australian Women Writer’s Challenge this year.

AWW-2018-badge-rose

Quoted from Press Release:

The Peacock Summer will be published in Australia and New Zealand by Hachette publisher Vanessa Radnidge, who says: ‘This is a deeply moving novel about family secrets and the damage that can carry down through generations. It is heartbreakingly good and utterly captivating as it explores themes of love, control, duty and the redemption and hope that comes from forgiveness. With this novel, Hannah Richell further proves her outstanding talent.’

BLURB:

TWO SUMMERS, DECADES APART. TWO WOMEN WHOSE LIVES ARE FOREVER ENTWINED. AND A HOUSE THAT HOLDS THE SECRETS THAT COULD FREE THEM BOTH.

At twenty-six, Lillian feels ancient and exhausted. Her marriage to Charles Oberon has not turned out the way she thought it would. To her it seems she is just another beautiful object captured within the walls of Cloudesley, her husband’s Chilterns manor house. But, with a young stepson and a sister to care for, Lillian accepts there is no way out for her. Then Charles makes an arrangement with an enigmatic artist visiting their home and her world is turned on its head.

Maggie Oberon ran from the hurt and resentment she caused. Half a world away, in Australia, it was easier to forget, to pretend she didn’t care. But when her grandmother, Lillian, falls ill she must head back to Cloudesley. Forced to face her past, she will learn that all she thought was real, all that she held so close, was never as it seemed.

An utterly compelling story of secrets, betrayals and the consequences of a long- ago summer.

Booktopia

2018 Australian Women Writer’s Challenge Sign-up and Pledge

Australian Women Writer’s Challenge 2018 Sign-up Post

 

AWW-2018-badge-rose

 2018 will be my second year participating in the Australian Women Writer’s Challenge. Last year, I aimed for the Miles level – to read six and review four. This year, I decided to create my own challenge, and aim for fifteen – I have at least that on a pile next to my desk, and I am sure many review books will come through that I can include.

The levels to choose from are:

  • Stella:read 4 – if reviewing, review at least 3
  • Miles:read 6 – if reviewing, review at least 4
  • Franklin:read 10 – if reviewing, review at least 6
  • Create your own challenge: nominate your own goal e.g. “Classics Challenge”.

Last year, I made a list of titles to tackle. I missed out on a few, (more about this in my wrap up post), so this year I’m not going to say what I will or won’t read, only to definitely state that review books for 2018 will be added, and I will read whatever else I can read to add to the list and reviews. Instead of committing myself to specific books, other than to read more of the Phryne Fisher series, I shall read what comes to hand each day, or week throughout 2018.

With many books obtained this year that have been written by Australian women that I intended to read this year but never got there, I will aim to read as many of these as possible within my custom challenge of fifteen.

The challenge began seven years ago. Each year participants aim to bring more attention to female writers in Australia, past and present, from diverse backgrounds as much as possible, and I do where I can find something. My main stipulation is that the book has to be in a genre I enjoy and have a compelling plot – which makes it more fun and engaging. I am hoping to read some of the books I had planned to include in 2017 but never got around to.

Authors I will definitely look to include will be: Sulari Gentill, Kate Forsyth, Lynette Noni, and Jessica Townsend. Keeping a keen eye on publicity catalogues and bookstores, I am hoping to write about other aspects of Australian literature too as a side project for myself.

With any luck, I will go beyond the fifteen books I have pledged, and will attempt to post more updates than I did this year so you can track my progress. If you haven’t already, think about signing up if you want to participate, and join the Facebook group where members are always on hand with suggestions, and their reviews to help you reach your goals.

Booktopia

It’s almost here…the 20th Anniversary of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

hplogo.gif

hp20_230

In just one month, on the 26th of June, J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone will turn twenty. In June 1997, the world was introduced to a skinny, bespectacled boy with wild black hair and green eyes that reminded everyone of his mother, and an orphan, living with vile relatives –Vernon, Petunia and their spoiled brat of a son, Dudley, when he discovers on his eleventh birthday that he is a wizard, and that his parents died at the hands of one of the most evil wizards around – Voldemort, and that he too should have died that night – but he lived – becoming famous in the wizarding world even before he sets foot on the grounds of Hogwarts.

harrypotterphilosp_2991278k

The Harry Potter books are often credited with engaging a new generation of children with reading – this is my generation, but the books have gone beyond that – to the next generation and adults, those who raised my generation, and adults now my age, sharing the stories with new readers.

Slide show of the 20th anniversary covers:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Harry Potter was an idea born on a train journey, and from that tiny seed in JK Rowling’s mind in the 1990s. has become the worldwide phenomenon it is today in 2017. Since publication, the series has sold over 450 million copies worldwide in 79 languages. To mark the twentieth anniversary at the end of June, Bloomsbury is releasing house editions of the first book – in paperback and hardcover.

harry-potter-20-hardback

Each house will have a specially designed crest on the front – black on red, blue, yellow or green for the paperbacks with coloured edges, and coloured imprints on black hard cover backgrounds with striped sprayed edges. Kate Greenaway Medal Winner, Levi Pinfold, who also illustrated Songs from Somewhere Else, and will compliment the story, and additional house information given in each edition for each individual house, does these illustrations. These illustrations and facts will be exclusive to the house edition you choose – I am hoping to get a Ravenclaw edition, so hopefully, Luna will be included in these additional facts.

twitter-gif

This year also sees the release of the illustrated edition of The Prisoner of Azkaban in October, so it’s going to be a magic filled year for Harry Potter fans. Gather your friends and take part in the fun, read the books again, have a party or play Harry Potter Trivial Pursuit (Yes it exists, I have it and have won) and see who knows their History of Magic as well as Hermione and Professor Binns.

 

 

The 2017 Richell Prize is open.

richell2015winner.jpg

The 2017 Richell Prize for Emerging Writers, sponsored by Hachette in partnership with The Guardian Australia and The Emerging Writer’s Festival is open for submissions. It is a prize that is awarded annually, and it is now in its third year, honouring Matt Richell, Hachette Australia’s former CEO, who died suddenly in 2014.

Richell-Prize-resized-logo-1

THE KEY DATES FOR THIS YEAR’S PRIZE:

ENTRIES OPEN: 27th March, 2017

ENTRIES CLOSE: 3rd July, 2017

WINNER ANNOUNCED: 1st November, 2017

From the Press Release:

Hachette Australia, along with the Richell family, is honoured to launch the third year of The Richell Prize for Emerging Writers, in partnership with The Guardian Australia and The Emerging Writers’ Festival (EWF). 

‘Hachette Australia’s core purpose is to contribute to the development and health of Australian culture through the power of storytelling, The Richell Prize is integral to that aim, and we are so proud to once again offer this prize to emerging writers’ – Fiona Hazard, Publishing Director – Hachette Australia.

‘The Richell Prize has opened, and continues to open, so many wonderful doors, from the support, interest and expert advice given by Hachette Australia and many others to renewed self-confidence in the writing process.  It is a unique, exciting and generous prize, a real game-changer that keeps on giving’ – Sally Abbott, author of the forthcoming CLOSING DOWN (to be published by Hachette Australia in May 2017) and winner of the inaugural Richell Prize for Emerging Writers (2015).

The Prize is once again open to unpublished writers of adult fiction and adult narrative non-fiction. Writers do not need to have a full manuscript at the time of submission, though they must intend to complete one. The Prize will be judged on the first three chapters of the submitted work, along with a synopsis outlining the direction of the proposed work and detail about how the author’s writing career would benefit from winning the Prize.

‘The Richell Prize provides a unique opportunity for an emerging writer in that it not only comes with a cash prize – which directly translates into time to write and further develop craft – but also a 12-month mentorship with one of Hachette Australia’s expert publishers. The prize can provide a foot in the door to the publishing industry not only for the winner, but also other entrants and shortlisted writers.’ – Izzy Roberts – Orr, Creative Director of the Emerging Writers’ Festival

emerging

The winner of the Richell Prize receives $10,000 in prize money from Hachette Australia, a year’s mentorship with a publisher at Hachette, and the winning writer will work with Hachette to develop their manuscript – with Hachette receiving first option to consider the finished work and the shortlisted entries for publcation.

There have been two winners so far:

2015 – Sally Abbott – Closing Down, published in May 2017, and a shortlisted author from the same year – Brodie Lancaster – No Way! Okay, Fine to be published in July this year.

All details of the award can be found at www.emergingwritersfestival.org.au and www.hachette.com.au.

images

Booktopia