The Final Bingo – Bingo Card Two

Book bingo take 2

Book Bingo Twenty-Five – The Final Bingo – A forgotten classic, a book based on a true story, and a book written more than ten years ago.

 

Wow, that came around quickly! Our final Book Bingo Saturday with Theresa Smith Writes and Mrs B’s Book Reviews for 2018. And to finish the year off, I have completed two bingo cards, and have filled a few squares in this one with one or two from the last card, but that were in different squares – the majority were different books, but all read across the past twelve months.

Book bingo take 2 .jpg

The final three squares I had to fill in were a forgotten classic, a book based on a true story, and a book written more than ten years ago – of the three, I used one book from the previous card, because it fit a few squares and it worked out well to ensure all the squares were taken up. Two of these books were Australian, and the third that fits in the book published more than ten years ago is a Christmas story, giving this post a touch of Christmas at the right time of year.

 

little fairy sisterTo begin, the square for a forgotten classic is taken up by a husband and wife writer and artist team – Ida Rentoul Outhwaite, who drew the pictures, and her husband, Grenbery Outhwaite, who wrote the text to the story The Little Fairy Sister. A uniquely Australian story yet at the same time, filled with the European fairy story traditions that young children in the colony would have grown up with. These traditions were transplanted into an Australian environment where both traditions are recognisable by readers. This book was one that I had not heard of until recently, despite my research and studies into the fairy tale tradition – it had never come across my radar in quite the same way as Arthur Rackham did, for example. Many people are familiar with Rackham, and other European illustrators and fairy tale collectors and writers, and there are several Australian authors that when mentioned, people will recognise. But Ida and Grenbery are often not mentioned, and perhaps should be mentioned more and more Australian fairy stories should be brought to life and light for a new generation to enjoy.

The-Tattooist_FCR_Final

My second book filled the square in the first card for a book that scared me. Usually, this would be interpreted as horror or a thriller, monsters and demons. Yet for me, it is what humans can do to other humans that scares me. It is the human ability to harm and kill, to torture mentally and physically for pleasure, and to harm – and this book was The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris. This time, it fills in the square of a book based on a true story. It tells the story of Lale Solokov, and how he survived Auschwitz, where he met his wife, by becoming the person who would tattoo the numbers onto all the prisoners as they were brought into the camp during the years it ran during World War Two. Heather Morris has fictionalised Lale’s story, but it is no less harrowing, scary and upsetting – and now, whenever I read about Auschwitz and the tattoos, I wonder how many of those people – Lale would have encountered during his time as the tattooist.

 

the-nutcrackerEnding on a lighter note, a Christmas story has been chosen to fill the square labelled a book published more than ten years ago – The Nutcracker by Alexandre Dumas, published in 1844. It tells the story of Mary, who is given a nutcracker doll one Christmas by her Godfather Drosselmeyer, and her toys come to life, and take her on a journey through a fantasy realm of magic, and dolls, and fairies in a wholly different realm, where she takes on the Mouse King and finds out where she belongs in the realm. It takes place at Christmas, which is rather appropriate for this post, seeing as it is almost Christmas, and in the approaching weeks, I am hoping to read some Christmas books and watch some Christmas movies to get in the mood, and the Nutcracker has started this process.

 

These final three books have concluded my challenge, apart from my wrap up post in a few weeks for the bingo challenge. Below is the text list of the books I read for this stage. Both lists will be included in the wrap up post.

AWW-2018-badge-rose

Challenge #4: Book Bingo Take 2

(Rows Across)

Row #1 – – BINGO

A book set more than 100 years ago: The Gypsy Crown by Kate Forsyth (Chain of Charms #1) – AWW2018

A book written more than ten years ago: The Nutcracker by Alexandre Dumas

A memoir: No Country Woman by Zoya Patel – AWW2018

A book more than 500 pages: The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton – AWW2018

A Foreign translated novel: The Distance Between Me and the Cherry Tree by Paola Peretti

 Row #2 – BINGO

A book with a yellow cover: Australia Day by Melanie Cheng – AWW2018

A book by an author you’ve never read before: If Kisses Cured Cancer by T.S. Hawken

A non-fiction book: Amazing Australian Women: Twelve Women Who Shaped History by Pamela Freeman and Sophie Beer – AWW2018

 A collection of short stories: Fairy Tales for Feisty Girls by Susannah McFarlane – AWW2018

A book with themes of culture: Relic of the Blue Dragon (Children of the Dragon #1) by Rebecca Lim – AWW2018

Row #3:  – BINGO

A book written by an Australian woman:Disappearing Act by Jacqueline Harvey (Kensy and Max #2) – AWW2018, The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton – AWW2018

A book written by an Australian man: Captain Cook’s Apprentice by Anthony Hill

A prize-winning book: Chain of Charms series by Kate Forsyth – 2007 Aurealis Award for Best Children’s Fiction – AWW2018

A book that scares you: What the Woods Keep by Katya de Becerra – AWW2018

A book with a mystery: The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes (Mitford Murders #1)

 Row #4 – BINGO

A forgotten classic: The Little Fairy Sister by Ida Rentoul Outhwaite and Grenbery Outhwaite

A book with a one-word title: Wundersmith by Jessica Townsend – AWW2018

A book with non-human characters: A Home for Molly by Holly Webb, Beast World by George Ivanoff

A funny book: Archibald, the Naughtiest Elf in the World Goes to the Zoo by Skye Davidson, Illustrated by Ágnes Rokiczky -AWW2018

A book with a number in the title: We Three Heroes by Lynette Noni – AWW2018

 Row #5 -BINGO

 A book that became a movie: Victoria and Abdul: The Extraordinary True Story of the Queen’s Closest Confidant by Shrabani Busi

A book based on a true story: The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris – AWW2018*

A book everyone is talking about: Lenny’s Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee – AWW2018

A book written by someone under thirty: The Yellow House by Emily O’Grady – AWW2018

A book written by someone over sixty: Miss Lily’s Lovely Ladies by Jackie French – AWW2018

 Rows Down

Row #1 – – BINGO

 A book set more than 100 years ago: The Gypsy Crown by Kate Forsyth (Chain of Charms #1) – AWW2018

A book with a yellow cover: Australia Day by Melanie Cheng – AWW2018

A book written by an Australian woman: Disappearing Act by Jacqueline Harvey (Kensy and Max #2) – AWW2018

A forgotten classic: The Little Fairy Sister by Ida Rentoul Outhwaite and Grenbery Outhwaite

A book that became a movie: Victoria and Abdul: The Extraordinary True Story of the Queen’s Closest Confidant by Shrabani Busi

Row #2 -BINGO

 A book written more than ten years ago: The Nutcracker by Alexandre Dumas

A book by an author you’ve never read before: If Kisses Cured Cancer by T.S. Hawken

A book written by an Australian man: Captain Cook’s Apprentice by Anthony Hill

A book with a one-word title:Wundersmith by Jessica Townsend – AWW2018

A book based on a true story: The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris – AWW2018

 Row #3: – BINGO

 A memoir: No Country Woman by Zoya Patel – AWW2018

A non-fiction book:Amazing Australian Women: Twelve Women Who Shaped History by Pamela Freeman and Sophie Beer – AWW2018

A prize-winning book: Chain of Charms series by Kate Forsyth – 2007 Aurealis Award for Best Children’s Fiction – aWW2018

A book with non-human characters: A Home for Molly by Holly Webb, Beast World by George Ivanoff

A book everyone is talking about: Lenny’s Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee – AWW2018

 Row #4 -BINGO

 A book more than 500 pages: The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton – AWW2018

A collection of short stories: Fairy Tales for Feisty Girls by Susannah McFarlane – AWW2018

A book that scares you: What the Woods Keep by Katya de Becerra – AWW2018

A funny book: Archibald, the Naughtiest Elf in the World Goes to the Zoo by Skye Davidson, Illustrated by Ágnes Rokiczky -AWW2018

A book written by someone under thirty: The Yellow House by Emily O’Grady – AWW2018

 Row #5 – BINGO

 A Foreign Translated Novel: The Distance Between Me and the Cherry Tree by Paola Peretti

A book with themes of culture: Relic of the Blue Dragon (Children of the Dragon #1) by Rebecca Lim – AWW2018

A book with a mystery: The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes (Mitford Murders #1)

A book with a number in the title: We Three Heroes by Lynette Noni – AWW2018

A book written by someone over sixty: Miss Lily’s Lovely Ladies by Jackie French – AWW2018

 

In the next few weeks, I will be writing wrap up posts of my reading challenges overall, and each one, including my book bingo challenge, leading up into 2019 and within the first week of January, I will be aiming to start each new challenge for the new year and introduce those on my blog – perhaps with a challenge that has more open categories for one of them as there were some books that I was unable to get to as the categories were overly specific which made it much harder (trying to find an author with my first or last name was rather impossible in one challenge).

Booktopia

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