2017 Richell Prize for Emerging Writer’s Long List

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Encouraging emerging writers in Australia to contribute to the growing literary landscape of Australian literature is the impetus behind prizes such as the Richell Prize, currently in its third year. The Richell Prize was established in 2014 by Hachette Australia in partnership with The Guardian and The Emerging Writer’s Festival to assist emerging writers take the next step in their career. It is open to unpublished writers or adult fiction and adult non-fiction. Though applicants do not need a full manuscript at the time of entry, they must intend to complete one.

imagesHachette will donate $10,000, which is awarded to the winner, and will offer the winner a 12-month mentorship to develop their novel. Prizes like this are important to the Australian industry, as they encourage new Australian voices to be heard in a world where louder international voices threaten to drown local voices out, and creates a literary culture that we can relate to in our own country.

Whilst Hachette does not offer a publishing deal, the mentoring opportunity will help the winner get their manuscript to a stage where they can begin to discuss publishing opportunities with Hachette.

This year’s long list of twenty from 579 entries:

Michelle Barraclough, As I Am
Meagan Bertram, Trapped
Lucinda Coleman, Windjana
Sam Coley, State Highway One
Miranda Debeljakovic, Waiting for the Sun
Jacquie Garton-Smith, The Taste of Red Dust
Rose Hartley, The Caravan
Diana Jarman, The Philatelist’s Album
Julie Keys, Triptych
Kinch Kinski, Tabula
Carolyn Malkin, The Demon Drink
Fay Patterson, Tinker Tinker
Caitlin Porter, The Pearl Diver
Natasha Rai, Light in Dark Corners
Julie Scanlon, The Other Shade of Black
Stewart Sheargold, Wolf Whistle
Joshua Taylor, The Life and Times of a River
Jacqueline Trott, The Song of River Country
Bronte Winn, Edward
Karen Wyld, Where the Fruit Falls

From this long list, a short list will be chosen, and from there, a winner will be selected in the coming months, and I will try to keep you all updated via my blog.

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The 2017 Richell Prize is open.

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The 2017 Richell Prize for Emerging Writers, sponsored by Hachette in partnership with The Guardian Australia and The Emerging Writer’s Festival is open for submissions. It is a prize that is awarded annually, and it is now in its third year, honouring Matt Richell, Hachette Australia’s former CEO, who died suddenly in 2014.

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THE KEY DATES FOR THIS YEAR’S PRIZE:

ENTRIES OPEN: 27th March, 2017

ENTRIES CLOSE: 3rd July, 2017

WINNER ANNOUNCED: 1st November, 2017

From the Press Release:

Hachette Australia, along with the Richell family, is honoured to launch the third year of The Richell Prize for Emerging Writers, in partnership with The Guardian Australia and The Emerging Writers’ Festival (EWF). 

‘Hachette Australia’s core purpose is to contribute to the development and health of Australian culture through the power of storytelling, The Richell Prize is integral to that aim, and we are so proud to once again offer this prize to emerging writers’ – Fiona Hazard, Publishing Director – Hachette Australia.

‘The Richell Prize has opened, and continues to open, so many wonderful doors, from the support, interest and expert advice given by Hachette Australia and many others to renewed self-confidence in the writing process.  It is a unique, exciting and generous prize, a real game-changer that keeps on giving’ – Sally Abbott, author of the forthcoming CLOSING DOWN (to be published by Hachette Australia in May 2017) and winner of the inaugural Richell Prize for Emerging Writers (2015).

The Prize is once again open to unpublished writers of adult fiction and adult narrative non-fiction. Writers do not need to have a full manuscript at the time of submission, though they must intend to complete one. The Prize will be judged on the first three chapters of the submitted work, along with a synopsis outlining the direction of the proposed work and detail about how the author’s writing career would benefit from winning the Prize.

‘The Richell Prize provides a unique opportunity for an emerging writer in that it not only comes with a cash prize – which directly translates into time to write and further develop craft – but also a 12-month mentorship with one of Hachette Australia’s expert publishers. The prize can provide a foot in the door to the publishing industry not only for the winner, but also other entrants and shortlisted writers.’ – Izzy Roberts – Orr, Creative Director of the Emerging Writers’ Festival

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The winner of the Richell Prize receives $10,000 in prize money from Hachette Australia, a year’s mentorship with a publisher at Hachette, and the winning writer will work with Hachette to develop their manuscript – with Hachette receiving first option to consider the finished work and the shortlisted entries for publcation.

There have been two winners so far:

2015 – Sally Abbott – Closing Down, published in May 2017, and a shortlisted author from the same year – Brodie Lancaster – No Way! Okay, Fine to be published in July this year.

All details of the award can be found at www.emergingwritersfestival.org.au and www.hachette.com.au.

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Richell Prize Shortlist and Emerging Writer’s Festival

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The Richell Prize shortlist, and The Emerging Writer’s Festival

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Literary prizes and festivals help new and emerging, as well as established writers earn money and get publicity and exposure. They allow writers to interact with each other, with readers, with publishers. Festivals across Australia and the world, such as the Emerging Writer’s Festival, The Sydney Writer’s Festival and The Edinburgh International Book Festival all promote a wonderful world of literature that cannot be replaced by anything, and show that people value the written word.

 

In 2014, Matt Richell, CEO of Hachette, died suddenly, and a literary prize for has been named in his honour. Matt Richell believed in investment and support for new writers, and believed investment in new writers was vital for the future. The prize is in place to encourage and nurture emerging writers in Australia. It is open to unpublished adult fiction and non-fiction. In 2016, Michaela Maguire, the director of The Emerging Writer’s Festival, Hannah Richell, author and reviewer, Karen Ferris, a bookseller at Harry Hartog, Lucy Clark, Senior Editor at The Guardian, Australia and Vanessa Radnidge, a Hachette Australia Publisher, are the judges for the Richell Prize. The five books on the short list for this year’s prize are:

 

The Illusion of Islands by Andrea Baldwin

Dark Tides by Emma Doolan

The Clinking by Susie Greenhill

The Rabbits by Sophie Overett

Gardens of Stone by Susie Thatcher

 

The applicants submitted the first three chapters of their work, and a synopsis, and the winner receives $10,000, and a mentorship with a Hachette publisher. Hachette will work with the winning writer to develop their novel and be the first to consider the work for publication. I am eager to see who wins this prize, as it would be a great achievement for them and their career, and also, for Australian literature.

 

The winner will be announced in an awards ceremony on the 28th of September 2016. I hope to be able to post something on this blog about the recipient and review their book when it comes out.

 

The Richell Prize is organised by The Emerging Writer’s Festival, Hachette Australia, The Guardian Australia and Simpson Solicitors. Most literary prizes are aimed at already published books, but prizes like this that give encouragement and mentorship to emerging writers are wonderful to have in the literary world.

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The Emerging Writer’s Festival is an organisation based on supporting emerging writers in Australia. They nurture new voices and talent and encourage diversity in the stories. In the current climate and uncertainty of the fate of the Australian publishing industry in light of the Productivity Commission, organisations like this, which is non-profit, are beneficial to new and emerging writers.